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Planting a Dry Garden

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Creating a lovely garden without artificial watering or excessive irrigating is relatively easy. There are changes in how the garden is planted and maintained and in very dry locations there may be periods of near dormancy during the driest periods of the year. But overall, it is more a challenge to our habits and routines than to the botanical survival of the garden. Firstly, plant and transplant early so that root systems become well established in advance of dry weather.
 
Dig deeply so that root systems can penetrate into ground water. Peat, compost or similar soil additives well dug into the earth will help retain moisture for the new root system. Adding fertiliser to the bottom of planting holes will not only strengthen the plant but further encourage deeper root growth. If water is available, a bucket-full poured into the bottom of the planting hole once the tree or shrub in set in place will insure that roots are damp from the start.
 
Once the soil is filled in and firmed down, place a mulch around the plant to help maintain all available water. A 20cm deep mulch would not be excessive for anything exposed to extreme drying conditions. The broader the area of mulch is the more water will be collected under it for the plant to use.
 
Lift and divide perennials now rather than later so they can become established during wet weather. If possible do not transplant, divide, or disturb anything unless absolutely necessary unless weather conditions are ideal. It would be better for a specimen to remain overcrowded for another year than dead due to lack of watering!
 
Desert and arid regions around the world are rich in flora and fauna. Fine gardens still exist there. The secret is planting drought resistant species. Acacia, the Australian Wattle, is particularly at home in very dry, well drained soils, even gravels and stones. There are at least 1000 species but only 20 grow well here (our climate is too wet!). Prune lightly after flowering to keep bushy.
 
Don't overfeed, if at all. Excellent on the coast, basically trouble and pest free and many species flower over winter when not much else does. Handsome trees and shrubs year round.

About us

dale-john 01-100x66 Dale Harvey and John Newton met in Melbourne Australia in 1981. Since then they both have supported each others careers while also building and maintaining their own. Read about how they were able to turn their joint careers into one and creating a dream of a better world starting in their own local community.

Media & Publications

host daffodils-100x66The following articles are a small part of the many published editorials on or about both Dale Harvey and John Newton plus the property affectionately nick named by the people of New Zealand, as the
"Quarter Acre” Paradise gardens.

Awards & Credits

HOPE Trust-100x66This is a collection of Appreciation Certificates, Local and Overseas Awards with Acknowledgments presented to Dale Harvey and John Newton over the many years of their joint careers plus the Launch and Registration
of The H.O.P.E. Trust
The Healing of Planet Earth.

Contact Us

P.O.Box Papatoetoe Central
2156 Auckland
New Zealand
Tel: +61 9 276 4827
Fax: +61 9 276 4025
Email: info@daleharvey.com 
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