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Botanical
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Acacia cognata (selected dwarf form)  Mop Top A low mounding dense shrub (60-90cm x 90cm-1.2m) with narrow aromatic foliage, plum-coloured new growth, and bright yellow perfumed flowers in spring. It is ideal for use as soft low hedging along pathways; mass planted on banks or wide garden beds where design impact is required; as an accent container plant for courtyard, terrace or patio. Seed eaters such as Bronze-wing Pigeons; attracts insects to the pollen and therefore is a food source for insect eaters such as wrens and thornbills. Likes full sun or light shade, and tolerates medium frosts. Suited to both inland and coastal situations. Plants may be lightly trimmed for shape several times during the year, and after flowering. Feed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer.
Acacia iteaphylla Flinders Range Wattle Medium to large shrub, dense pendulosa, grey foliage with purple tips. Flowers in Australia's winter to spring. The Australian Ringneck Parrot is attracted to this plant. Can be trimmed after flowering.
Acacia spectabilis Mudgee Wattle or Pilliga Wattle Grows 2-5 metres and is frost hardy. Yellow ball-shaped flowers which appear in winter and spring. Attracts Tailed Emperor butterflies (Polyura sempronius); Large Grass Yellow butterfllies (Eurema hecabe), and Common Imperial Blue butterflies (Jalmenus evagoras). Attracts Long-billed Corella. A very adaptable frost and drought resistant tree. Is grown widely throughout Australia. Prune lightly after flowering to create more bushy habit.
Acacia verniciflua form Sigma Weeping Wattle A small to medium shrub (1.5-2m x 1.5 - 1.8m) with gently weeping habit, attractive curved foliage and perfumed golden flowers covering stems in early spring. Seed is sought by ground feeding birds such as the Bronzewing Pigeon. Small foraging birds such as wrens and robins will seek insects constantly amongst the foliage. Full sun or light shade is suitable, and heavy frost is tolerated. May be grown in both coastal and inland gardens, and is especially suitable as a light screen or hedge, or may be part of a mixed shrubbery for attractive effect. Only light trimming is required after flowering. Feed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer. Prefers dry or well drained clay or sandy loams with neutral to acid pH.
Acmena smithii Lilly Pilly Bushy tree up to 10 metres with dark green shiny leaves and bronze to pink/red new growth. Prolific white flowers during late spring/early summer are followed by berries which vary in colour from white to pink or purple. Grown for their glossy foliage and decorative edible fruits and shade. Flowers are the food plant of Common Red-eye Butterflies (Chaetocneme beata) and Eastern Flat butterflies (Netrocoryne repanda). Fruit eaten by birds - Bowerbirds, Currawongs, Koel, Topknot Pigeon, Australian King Parrot, Rose-crowned Fruit-dove, Wampoo Fruit-dove. Also attracts Grey-headed Flying Fox. Most soil types except extremely dry or wet. Partial to full sun. Light frosts only.
Actinotus helianthi 'Parkes Star' Sydney Flannel Flower A short lived perennial, usually 3-4 years. It grows approximately 70cm high and 60cm wide. The common name comes from the flannel-like texture of the creamy white flowers which often have green tips. Parkes Star is an early flowerer, with blooms appearing from August-October with occassional flushes in summer. Best flower yield occurs in the second season. The flowers have a daisy-like appearance. Leaves are heavily divided, silvery-grey in colour and have a felt-like appearance and texture. They are an ideal plant for cottage-style gardens, rockeries or in containers. The blooms are excellent as cut-flowers. Attracts Red-rumped parrots (grass parrots) which use the flower heads as a source of seed. Also attracts butterflies. Plant in full sun or partly shaded position. Tolerant of light frost once established. Requires very free-draining soil. Fertilise regularly with slow-release fertiliser suitable for Ausralian native. Only requires modest watering but avoid wetting the foliage. Mulch around the plant to a maximum depth of 5cm as too much mulch can cause stem problems. Provide protection from stong winds. Prune after flowering (not inyo old wood) to encourage second flush of flowers. Remove any dead growth. Suitable for native, cottage and perennial garden styles. Also suited to planting in large tibs.
Actinotus helianthi 'Starbright' Sydney Flannel Flower A short lived perennial, usually 3-4 years. It grows approximately 70cm high and 60cm wide. The common name comes from the flannel-like texture of the creamy white flowers which often have green tips. The flowers have a daisy-like appearance and bloom mid-late spring to early summer. Leaves are heavily divided, silvery-grey in colour and have a felt-like appearance and texture. They are an ideal plant for cottage-style gardens, rockeries or in containers. The blooms are excellent as cut-flowers. Attracts Red-rumped parrots (grass parrots) which use the flower heads as a source of seed. Also attracts butterflies. Prefers lightly filtered sunlight or sun for part of the day. Frost tolerant to -4 degrees. Prefers well-drained sandy loam and clay loam soils. Avoid wetting the foliage when watering. Provide protection from strong winds. Fertilise regularly with slow-release fertiliser. Prune after flowering. Tip prune through late summer/early autumn. Mulch to a maximum depth of 5cm. Too much mulch can lead to stem rot problems.
Allocasuarina littoralis Black She-Oak Small rounded evergreen tree. Reddish, male and female flowers appear in winter. Fruits are hard, woody, cylindrical cones, flattened at each end. Attracts Mistletoe Host butterflies especially Amyrillis azure (Ogyris amyrillis amyrillis). Attracts Crimson Rosellas and Glossy Black Cockatoos feed on cones. Suited to any well-drained soil and position. Can withstand dry periods and is ideal for protected coastal gardens. Is frost-resistant.
Allocasuarina muellerana Salty She-Oak Shrub or even small tree 1-5 to 4 metres high. Attracts Mistletoe Host butterflies especially Amyrillis azure (Ogyris amyrillis amyrillis). Seeds extracted by large parrots and Crimson Rosellas, Glossy Black-cockatoos and Galahs. Prefers dry conditions. Tolerates poor soils.
Allocasuarina verticillata Drooping She- Oak Small to medium tree, weeping needle-like branches - 5-8 metres high. Attracts Mistletoe Host butterflies especially Amyrillis azure (Ogyris amyrillis amyrillis). Birds seek insects in fruits and branches. Ripening fruit eagerly sought by Yellow and Red-tailed Black Cockatoo, also Glossy Black Cockatoo, various parrots.Any soil including limestone.
Anigozanthos 'Bush-gems' Kangaroo Paw Bush-gems include a range of hybrid Kangaroo Paws. 'Bush Gems' are clumping plants with strap-like leaves. Unusual flowers on 1-1.5 metre stems in various shades of red, orange, yellow, green and pink. Best hybrids are those with Anigozanthos flavidus as one parent. Attracts honeyeaters and nectar eating birds. Likes well-drained soils and open sunny position. Flowers are affected by frost.
Anigozanthos flavidus (and its hybrids) Green Kangaroo Paw Clumping perennial with creeping rhizomes and strap-like green leaves to about 1 metre long. Flower stems to about 2 metres tall with hairy tubular flowers of green, yellow, pink tored or sometimes orange in late spring and summer. Many of the hybrids (not all) are very reliable in a wide range of conditions. I.e. Yellow Gem, Big Red, Gold Fever, Bush Pearl. Upright foliage should be good for frogs if planted near water.Prefers dry soil and sunny position. Old leaves and flower stems should be removed. Can shear to ground level every 1-3 years to rejuvenate plants. Best if fed every year in autumn & divided approx. every 5 years or when the clumps get too big.
Anigozanthos humilis Cats Paw Small tufting and clumping plant foliage gets to 20 cm. High flowers to 25 cm. Miniature kangaroo paws with orange/yellow tones. Great for rockeries. Bog and tufting plants. Image shown is a similar species. Good source of food for honeyeaters - Also attracts Red-capped Parrot. Hates being waterlogged. Very hardy and suited to most conditions including shady and moist situations.
Anigozanthos manglesii Red & Green Kangaroo Paw Western Australia's floral emblem. Brilliant red and green flowers - a fantastic perennial plant. Flowers reach a height of 50-60 cm. Grey/ green foliage. Attracts honeyeaters. Doesn't like overhead watering in summer nor heavy soil.
Anigozanthos spp Kangaroo Paw Medium to tall with strap leaves. New cultivars are more tolerant of East Coast conditions. Spring flowering. Attracts honeyeaters. Talk to your local Flora for fauna Nursery staff to select appropriate cultivars for your climate.
Archirhodomyrtus beckleri selected form Edna Walling Rose Myrtle™ A graceful weeping small shrub (1-1.2m x 60-90cm) with shiny foliage and perfumed shell pink flowers in late spring and summer. The flowers are followed in late summer by edible sweet orange-red fruit. The prefix Edna Walling denotes this selection as representative of the style of plants which Edna Walling, the noted Australian garden designer of the mid-1900s, could have used in present-day gardens. Attracts pollinating agents such as native bees and insects, and is therefore a useful source of food for insect-eating birds such as wrens, thornbills and flycatchers. Prefers light shade; best protected from frost and severe winds. May be grown in a mixed bed of semi-shade loving plants, or in the filtered light of a fernery. An outstanding container plant for deck, patio or courtyard. Feed lightly with low phosphorus fertilizer in early spring or late summer, prune lightly for shape after flowering and fruiting has finished. The fruit is also edible for humans, and may be made into a delicious sticky jam. Prefers moist clay loams, neutral to acid ph>
Austromyrtus dulcis Midyim, Midgen Berry Spreading plant 0.5-1metre x 1-1.2metres, with dark green foliage and bronze flushes of new growth. Small white flowers in late spring/summer are followed by whitish speckled edible berries. Fruit are good for fruit eating birds (and humans). Orioles, bowerbirds, some honeyeaters eg Lewins are attracted to this plant. Wide variety of soils as long as drainage is reasonable. Semi-shaded to full sun position. Protect from heavy frost and water during prolonged dry spells.
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Baeckea virgata Twiggy Heath Myrtle Evergreen bush shrub with narrow dark green leaves and masses of white flowers in summer. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies, beetles and tree-frogs. Very hardy. Neat shrub and a good screen plant.
Banksia aemula (syn.Bankisa serratifolia) Wallum Banksia Robust winter flowering Australian native shrub of character. Stiff shiny serrated leaves form a bushy shrub to tree. Prominent creamy-white flowers in winter and long lasting wooden seed pods. Attractive gnarled bark. Honeyeaters, wattlebirds and parrots are attracted to this plant. Suited to moist soils in full sun. Tolerant of tropical climates, salt spray, and wet soils. Mulch well. Prune lightly to shape. Great protection for other plants in coastal garden. Good windbreak.
Banksia ericifolia Banksia Burgundy or Heath Banksia Dense shrub growing to approximately 4-5 metres. Attractive perfumed cones autumn to winter. Larval food plant for Double-headed Hawkmoth (Coequosa triangularis) butterflies. An important dense shrub for birds. Honeyeaters take nectar and insects. Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos will eat seeds. Wattlebirds and parrots are also attracted to the flowers. Frost resistant. Suited to any position. Mulch with organic material. Infrequent watering preferred once established. Prune after flowering to retain density.
Banksia ericifolia Dwarf Burgundy Dwarf A beautiful, compact and dwarf selection of the Heath Banksia. It grows into a compact bush to around 1.5 metres high and similar width. It features bright burgundy coloured 'candle' flowers from mid autumn until early spring. Makes an excellent landscaping feature or long lasting container specimen. Larvel food plant for Double-headed Hawkmoth (Coequosa triangularis) butterfly. An important dense shrub for birds. Honeyeaters take nectar and insects. Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos will eat seeds. Adapts well to a wide variety of soils and conditions and although tolerant of some wetness, prefers good drainage. Grows best in full sun or light shade. Suitable for seaside plantings.
Banksia integrifolia Coast Banksia An upright to spreading tree with grey slightly rough hard bark, narrow to oblong dark green leaves with silvery erect pale yellow spikes to 15 cm long produced mainly through autumn to spring. Silvery grey oblong cones release the ripe seed. Larval food plant for Double-headed Hawkmoth (Coequosa triangularis) butterfly. Attracts nectar feeding birds, including Rainbow Lorikeets, Scaly-breasted Musk Lorikeets; seed eating birds such as Gang Gangs, Galahs, Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos, parrots and rosellas. Also attracts insect eating birds as many insects are attracted to flower heads. Possums may nest in this plant and small possums collect nectar. Needs full sunshine for best results. Dislikes poor drainage and phosphorus.
Banksia integrifolia (prostrate form) Rollercoaster Groundcover 50cm-75cm x 2-3 metres with dull green leaves which have an attractive silvery-white underside. Pale yellow flower spikes occur from summer to mid-winter. Use as a stunning landscape statement plant with a beautifully sculpted trunk; looks remarkable cascading down walls or over banks. Makes a dramatic large container plant. Larval food plant for Double-headed Hawkmoth (Coequosa triangularis) butterflies. Nectar rich flowers are excellent for nectar feeding birds and lorikeets. Eastern Rosellas feed on fruit. Possums and other nectar feeding mammals feed on flowers. Prefers well-drained soils in sunny positions. Tolerant of frosts, wind and salt spray.
Banksia marginata Silver Banksia Small tree. Variable plant from 1metre shrub to tree 3-7 metres. Larval food plant for Double-headed Hawkmoth (Coequosa triangularis) butterflies. Attracts nectar feeding birds including honeyeaters, lorikeets and Yellow-tailed Black-cockatoos. Also attracts seed eating birds including Yellow-tailed Black cockatoos and parrots. This plant is more important for insectivorous birds than for nectar eating birds. Also attracts nectar feeding fauna - pygmy possums, sugar gliders. Provides pollen for native bees. Antechinus feed on attracted insects. This banksia can grow in a variety of climatic conditions. It prefers full sun but will grow in some shade and is frost-resistant.
Banksia prionotes Orange Banksia, Acorn Banksia Small tree usually around 6 metres. Beautiful orange flowers late autumn/winter. Attracts nectar-feeding birds and insects. Parrots like to eat the seeds. Grows best in well drained soils or as a container plant. Prefers full sun and is frost resistant. Suitable for protected coastal gardens.
Banksia repens Creeping Banksia Prostrate banksia with long erect leaves. Young growth and horizontal stems coloured with rusty red velvet hairs. Flowers are pink and cream with oblong cones. Flower in spring. Height 30cm and width 1 metre. Attracts nectar and seed eating birds. Acid soils with good drainage. Open sunny position.
Banksia robur Swamp Banksia One of the most handsome and hardiest species of eastern banksias. Broad glossy leaves surround the floral spikes which begin as blue-green, open to gold and mature to rich brown. Thicket planting offers a dramatic landscape contrast. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. A moist sunny situation is ideal. Will withstand wet soil.
Banksia serrata Saw Leaf Banksia Small to medium evergreen gnarled tree. Attractive green leaves with sharp pointed teeth. Bronze cones opening to yellow flowers during winter, spring and summer. First plant described in Australia by Sir Joseph Banks. Larval food plant for Double-headed Hawkmoth (Coequosa triangularis) butterflies. Attracts Rainbow Lorikeets, Yellow-tailed Black Cockatoos, Swift Parrot. Also attracts Flying Foxes. Will tolerate poor sandy soil and is resistant to salt-spray. Ideal coastal plants.
Banksia spinulosa Hairpin Banksia; Banksia Stumpy Gold; Hill Banksia (various forms) A dense hardy shrub for moist open clay soils. This species is ideal for medium screening. Winter-flowering. It has gold and black brushes. Group planting will offer superb floral display. Larval food plant for Double-headed Hawkmoth (Coequosa triangularis) butterflies. Nectar rich flowers are excellent for nectar eating birds and mammals (Pygmy-Possums). Superb Fairy Wren prey on insects iattracted to foliage. This plant also attracts honeyeaters and Yellow-tailed Black cockatoos. Insectivorous birds will take insects that are attracted the flowers. Prune lightly to maintain a compact form.
Banksia spinulosa Birthday Candles A dwarf shrub (45cm x 50cm), compact and rounded in habit. Dense short narrow foliage, massed flowers of gold with red styles from late summer to late winter, extremely showy and dramatic. Particularly attractive to small honeyeaters for feeding on prolific nectar flow: Eastern Spinebills, New Holland Honeyeaters, White-plumed Honeyeaters. Pollen is a food source for native bees and insects. In ground: must be grown in well drained clay or sandy loams, neutral to slightly acid. In container: must have free draining slightly acid potting medium. Requires full sun to flower at its best, will tolerate light shade. Prune spent flowers, trim foliage to shape if necessary. Feed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer. Suited to coastal and inland gardens, frost tolerant.
Beaufortia squarrosa Sand Bottlebrush Compact shrub with small green leaves. The flowers are bright red and flower spring to autumn. Height 2metres and width 1-1.5metres. Attracts honeyeaters and nectar eating birds. Needs well-drained soils with an open sunny aspect.
Billardiera cymosa Sweet Apple Berry A light climber with wirey branches which often climb over other shrubs. Flowers are tubular with flared tips cream to bluish-white in clusters. Ripe fruit sought after by Red Wattlebird and Singing and Spiny-cheeked Honeyeaters.Attractive plant from dry inland areas is hardy in cultivation and will tolerate most soils and situations including limestone. Is frost-resistant.
Billardiera erubescens Red Biillardiera Twining climber growing to 3 metres with red tubular flowers. Image shown of a related species. Bowerbirds and rosellas eat the berries. A hardy plant that grows well in full sun or semi shade. It likes moist well-drained soils but will tolerate dry periods.
Billardiera longiflora Purple Appleberry Moderately vigorous twining climber. Cream-green flowers in spring and summer. This plant has edible shiny purple berries that attract bowerbirds and pigeons. Will grow in most soils and situations.
Billardiera scandens Common Appleberry A light twining climber with oblong dark green leaves. The greenish-yellow pendant bells produced throughout the year followed by greenish oblong berries to 3 cm. long. Attracts nectar feeding birds and honeyeaters eg Lewins and Olive-backed Orioles and Satin Bowerbirds. Butterflies gain nectar. Skinks eat soft fruits. Best grown in semi-shaded site which is moist for most of the year. Needs climbing support.
Blechnum minus Soft water fern A spreading ground fern growing to about 1metre tall. Erect to arching. Shiny green fronds, broad fish bone type, often with bronze new growth. Very narrow and brownish fertile fronds. All animals may rest in foliage. Frogs like the sheltered moist sites too. Birds such as Scrub Wrens and Superb Wrens are attracted to this plant. Best grown in semi-shaded or shaded, moist areas.
Boronia muelleri Sunset Serenade A bushy small to medium shrub with aromatic lobed leaves. Grows to 1-1.5metres high x 1-1.5 metres wide. Wonderful display of pale pink four-petalled starry flowers in spring. Butterflies collect nectar. Bushes can have many butterflies, at a time, when in flower, especially Painted Lady butterflies and Common Brown butterflies. Does well in a semi-shaded or partially sunny site but also tolerates full sunshine. Likes moist, not 'too' rich soils. Prune during and after flowering.
Brachychiton acerifolius Flame Tree Erect deciduous tree shedding its leaves during flowering period. Bell-like deep pink flowers appear in massed panicles in summer. Attracts Common Aeroplane butterflies (Paedyma shepherdi); Tailed Emperor butterflies (Polyura sempronius); White-banded Plane butterflies (Phaedyma shepherdi); Dark Ciliated Blue butterflies (Anthene seltuttus); Shining Pencilled Blue butterflies (Candalides helenita); and Common Pencilled Blue butterflies (Candalides absimilis). Attracts Australian King-parrot and Eastern Rosella. Plant in deep soil and in an open sunny position for best flowering. Frost sensitive in first few years. After flowering mulch well and apply well-rotted compost and slow release fertiliser.
Brachychiton discolor Lacebark Tree Leaves are usually five-lobed and silvery on the underside. Rich pink, slightly furry, bell-like flowers in summer. Attracts Common Aeroplane butterflies (Paedyma shepherdi) and Tailed Emperor butterflies (Polyura sempronius). Adaptable to a range of conditions. Dislikes frost when young.
Brachychiton populneus Kurrajong Evergreen tree growing to 6 metres plus, with a dense rounded crown. Leaves are ovate. Bell shaped flowers, cream with brown inside. Attracts Tailed Emperor butterflies (Polyura sempronius); Eastern Flat butterflies (Netrocoryne repanda); White Banded Plane butterflies (Phaedyma shepherdi) and Common Pencilled Blue butterflies (Candalides absimilis). Soft Sand Ravens attracted to the seeds/fruit. Common Bronzewing Pigeons and Galahs are also attracted to this plant. Grows in most soils including dry conditions.
Brachyscome multifida vars. Native Daisy Grows in a spreading mound with fine foliage. Masses small daisies most of year. Frogs, lizards and beetles are attracted to this plant. Butterflies visit to rest and collect nectar. Also attracts beetles. Prune to shape. Hardy but does best in full sun and well drained soil.
Brachysema celsianum (syn B. lanceolatum Swan River Pea A small to medium shrub with scarlet pea flowers in winter/spring. Honeyeaters are attracted to this plant. Prune after flowering.
Bracteantha bracteata Everlasting Daisy - many cultivars available Groundcover to small shrub with papery flowers most of year. Flowers in white, cream, yellow, gold or pink. Attracts Painted Lady and other butterflies. Regular pruning or picking of flowers encourages bushy growth. These daisies can be senstive to frosts and in frost prone areas, they are best grown in late winter.
Breynia oblongifolia Coffee Bush Erect tree-like shrub growing to 2 metres with eliptical leaves. Small green flowers and globular succulent fruit. Attracts Common Grass Yellow butterflies. A hardy plant in coastal areas.
Bursaria spinosa Sweet Bursaria, Prickin Box Blackthorn Medium to tall shrub (or small tree) with dark green oblong small leaf and many thorns on stems. The small cream and sweetly scented starry flowers are produced in terminal clusters during summer (can start late spring) Host plant for many butterflies. including Eltham or Dull Copper (Paralucia pyrodiscus); Bright or Dark Copper (P. aurifer) and Bathurst or Purple Copper (P. spinifera). Provides bird nesting sites. Green Rosellas (Tasmania) are attracted to fruit. Frost hardy. Adapts well Best in full sun or semi-shade can be clipped for hedging. Excellent refuge for wildlife. Needs well-drained soil.
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Callistemon 'Baroondah Station' Callistemon 'Baroondah Station' Evergreen medium shrub with lovely pink brushes during summer. Attracts nectar eating birds. Prefers a moist well-drained position in full sun or part shade.
Callistemon brachyandrus Prickly Bottlebrush Rounded shrub to 3 metres by 2 metres. Open habitat unless pruned to encourage dense growth. Small red brushes have yellow anthers giving an overall orange appearance. Flowers in summer. Honeyeaters and other birds feed on nectar, forage for insects and shelter in branches. Regent parrots have been seen feeding on fruits. Needs good drainage but can withstand periods of flooding.
Callistemon 'Captain Cook' Callistemon 'Captain Cook' A dwarf form of callistemon viminalis, medium bushy shrub with long narrow leaves and weeping branches, large red brushes in spring and flushes of reddish new leaves all the year round. Hardy scarlet red plumes during spring. Ideal for tubs, pots or open ground. Attracts nectar feeding birds. Hardy and very useful landscape plant.
Callistemon citrinus 'Angela' Callistemon citrinus 'Angela' A handsome callistemon variety with white flowers tinged pink in the early summer and again in the autumn. Attracts honeyeaters. Good medium-large screening plant. May be pruned after flowering just behind flower heads to keep plant bushy and compact.
Callistemon citrinus 'Endeavour' Callistemon citrinus 'Endeavour' Upright shrub 2.5-3 metres x 2.5 metres with brilliant red flower spikes in spring and early autumn. Excellent for nectar feeding birds - including lorikeets, Musk and Crimson Rosellas. Almost any soil types (except extremely dry). Best in full sun. Withstands most frosts and moderate coastal exposure. Can be pruned heavily to maintain smaller size.
Callistemon citrinus low form Firebrand™ A low spreading fast growing shrub (50-80cm x 2-3m), with dense grey green foliage. Massed scarlet bottlebrush flowers in spring, summer and autumn, extremely attractive to honeyeaters. Particularly attractive to all honeyeaters, and to lorikeets seeking flowers and nectar. Thrives in full sun and will tolerate light shade; is hardy to most frosts, and grows well in coastal or inland situations. Especially useful in broad landscapes, parklands, or in large garden beds or on banks requiring dense quick cover. Pruning should follow each flowering season, and plants should be fed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer.
Callistemon citrinus 'White Ice' Callistemon citrinus 'White Ice' A compact, hardy, evergreen, low spreading shrub with light green leaves growing to 1 metre. Masses of large white bottle brush flowers covering the bush in spring and early summer. Nectar attracts honeyeaters and insects. Trim after flowering. Plant in a sunny spot or in a tub as a patio specimen.
Callistemon 'Dawson River Weeper' Callistemon 'Dawson River Weeper' A large shrub or small tree that grows quickly and develops a lovely weeping habitat within a few years. Red bottlebrushes appearing in late spring are clearly visible around the outside of plant. Attracts nectar feeding birds. Tolerate wet position.
Callistemon forresterae Genoa Glory™ A compact shrub (1.5-2.5m x 1.2-2m), single- or multi-stemmed, with light papery bark. Dense grey-green foliage and numerous bird-attracting glossy purple-maroon brushes bloom in spring and autumn. Provides nectar and nesting habitat for honeyeaters (especially New Holland, Eastern Spinebill, White-plumed, White-naped); food (insects) for Blue Wrens, Grey Fantails and Thornbills; pollen for native bees; seed for Crimson Rosellas. Hardy in moist to wet clay loams or sandy soils; likes full sun or light shade; frost hardy; suitable for 2nd line coastal situations. Maintenance: remove spent flowers regularly, prune foliage to shape after flowering. Feed with controlled release low phosphorus fertilizer in early spring or late summer.
Callistemon hybrid 'Demesne Prestige Pink' Callistemon 'Demesne Prestige Pink' Tidy rounded shrub. Grows to 2 metres high and 1.5 metres wide. Flowers are bright lolly pink when first opened and fade to soft pink. Spring is main flowering time however will flower throughout the year. Image shown of a similar species. Seeds attract rosellas and nectar attracts honeyeaters. Hardy grower, fertilize regularly and trim to shape.
Callistemon hybrid selection Mary MacKillop™ A dense lightly weeping medium shrub (2-2.5m x 1-2m) with glossy leaves and lettuce green new growth. Large cardinal red, bird attracting bottlebrush flowers highlight the foliage in spring and summer. It may be planted as a specimen or in groups in gardens or streetscapes and parklands; may be kept trimmed as a hedge; and may be grown successfully in a large container for patio or terrace. Attractive to all small honeyeaters, particularly New Holland Honeyeater. Grows well in full sun or light shade, and withstands medium frost. Suited to inland and coastal situations. Trim spent flowers regularly to promote even more and denser flowering in successive seasons; and clip to shape if using as a hedge. Feed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer. If grown in container, use best quality potting mix.
Callistemon kenmorrisonii Bekta Beauty This plant is a selected form of Callistemon kenmorrisonii which grows along the Bekta river near Mallacoota, Victoria. Bekta Beauty is a compact shrub (1.2m-1.8m x1.2-1.5m) single or multi-stemmed, with papery bark. Foliage is fresh light green and bright red new stems display the large dense bird-attracting crimson brushes in spring-summer. This plant provides nectar and nesting habitat for honeyeaters (especially New Holland, Eastern Spinebill, White-plumed, White-naped); food (insects) for Blue Wrens, Grey Fantails and Thornbills; pollen for native bees; seed for Crimson Rosellas. Hardy in moist to wet clay loams or sandy soils,; likes full sun or light shade; frost hardy; suitable for 2nd line coastal situations. Maintenance: remove spent flowers regularly, prune foliage to shape after flowering. Feed with controlled release low phosphorus fertilizer in early spring or late summer. Grows best on moist to wet soils with neutral to acid pH.
Callistemon 'King Park Special' Callistemon 'Kings Park Special' Upright shrub to 4 metres with bright red brushes and fine foliage. Prolific flowers in spring/summer. Seeds attract rosellas and nectar attracts honeyeaters. Prune after flowering to maintain shape.
Callistemon 'Lavender Showers' Callistemon 'Lavender Showers' Delightful evergreen tall shrub bearing beautiful large lavender/pink bottlebrush flowers throughout the year but with the main flush in spring/early summer. Seeds attract rosellas and nectar attracts honeyeaters. Keep moist at all times. Prune after flowering to maintain bushiness. Thrives in sunny position but keep moist.
Callistemon 'Mr Foster' Callistemon 'Mr Foster' Bushy shrub with several flushes of spectacular deep red flowers per year. Flowers are up to 20cm long and dusted with yellow pollen. Broad dark green foliage forms a tall strong growing bush. Spectacular hedge or wind break. Excellent feature shrub for a bright display throughout the year. Seeds attract rosellas and nectar attracts honeyeaters. Mulch soil well to reduce weeds and moisture loss. If tip-pruned regularly can be shaped as desired. Avoid cutting into old wood. Suitable for coastal climates.
Callistemon pachyphyllus Wallum Bottlebrush Erect or sometimes contorted shrub growing to 1.5 metres. Red or sometimes green flower. Spikes occur in summer and autumn. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies, birds and other honeyeaters. Very hardy - will tolerate poor drainage but needs full sun.
Callistemon pallidus Candle Glow A low arching shrub (60-90cm x 2-3.5m) with silver-grey foliage and perfumed, bright lemon brushes in spring-summer-autumn. A source of nectar for all small honeyeaters, and of pollen for native bees and insects, which in turn attract insectivorous birds such as wrens, thornbills,and flycatchers. Flowers are suitable for small possums (Ringtails). Hardy in moist well drained clay loams or sand and will tolerate seasonally wet conditions; withstands heavy frost. Prefers full sun but tolerates light shade, and is suitable for coastal and inland gardens. It is ideal for banks, open garden beds, parklands, median strip plantations and all broad landscape design. Flowers also last well when cut for indoor decoration. The shrub should be pruned hard for shape after flowering and to promote dense new silvery growth, as well as even more prolific flowering. Feed in early spring or late summer with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer.
Callistemon pallidus Candelabra An upright narrow dense shrub (2.5-3m x 1-2m) with masses of acid-yellow perfumed flowers in spring and summer, displayed well above the silver-grey foliage. Flowers are particularly attractive to a wide range of honeyeaters and lorikeets, and to native bees and insects. Definitely a source of nectar for honeyeaters and lorikeets of any species; a source of seed for rosellas; a source of pollen for butterflies and moths (likely), and for native bees and insects and therefore a source of food for insectivorous birds such as wrens, thornbills and flycatchers. Likely to be a source of food (nectar and flowers) for small possums (Ringtails) and even gliders (Feathertail, Sugar) if in locality. Hardy in moist to wet clay soils or moist sand, and is suited to drier climates if well watered. Extremely frost hardy, does well in either full sun or light shade. Ideal for narrow garden areas, as a screening plant or a specimen; may also be hedged. Well suited to parklands and streetscape planting. May be trimmed regularly to keep shrub even more compact, and spent flowers should be pruned regularly to stimulate even more flowering.
Callistemon pallidus Candle Glow A low arching shrub or groundcover (60-90cm x 2-3.5m) with silver-grey foliage and perfumed, bright lemon brushes in spring-summer-autumn. A source of nectar for all small honeyeaters, and of pollen for native bees and insects, which in turn attract insectivorous birds such as wrens, thornbills,and flycatchers. Flowers are suitable for small possums (Ringtails). Hardy in moist well drained clay loams or sand and will tolerate seasonally wet conditions; withstands heavy frost. Prefers full sun but tolerates light shade, and is suitable for coastal and inland gardens. It is ideal for banks, open garden beds, parklands, median strip plantations and all broad landscape design. Flowers also last well when cut for indoor decoration. The shrub should be pruned hard for shape after flowering and to promote dense new silvery growth, as well as even more prolific flowering. Feed in early spring or late summer with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer.
Callistemon recurvus Callistemon 'Tinaroo Dazzler' Compact shrub growing to 3 metres high by 2 metres wide. Bright red flower brushes with gold-tipped stamens. Image shown of a similar species. Attracts some butterflies. A brilliant nectar source for honeyeaters and lorikeets. Full sun - very hardy.
Callistemon 'Rocky Rambler' C.pearsonii Callistemon 'Rocky Rambler' Smallest of the C.pearsonii family. A very hardy prostrate shrub growing about 30cm high. Flowers are red with gold tips. Refer book about the flora of Blackdown Tablelands, called 'Plants on Central Queensland' by Pearsons. Seeds attract rosellas and nectar attracts honeyeaters. Good tall groundcover. Is frost hardy and ecellent bird-attracting plant. Can be grown from seed or cuttings.
Callistemon species Callistemon (Bottlebrush) Attractive shrubs and ground covers with large bottlebrush flowers. Attracts nectar and seed eating birds. Insects attracted to flowers. Small birds find shelter in foliage. Various species and cultivars grow in a variety of soils and positions. Generally likes a sunny position. Check with your local nursery for the appropriate species.
Callistemon speciosus Callistemon speciosus Medium open shrub with grey/green leaves, Flowers - bright red in spring and summer. Grows to 2.3 metres high and 2 metres wide. Attracts honeyeaters. Cool damp soils. Full sun to part shade.
Callistemon 'Taree Pink' Callistemon 'Taree Pink' Densely foliage shrub with pointed green leaves and hot pink (watermelon) bottlebrush flowers which are seen in abundance in spring. Excellent screen or informal hedge planted in rows. Ideal bird attracting plants. Honeyeaters sip nectar from flowers, while parrots will eat seeds. Smaller birds chase insects through foliage. Also provides cover and shelter for a range of animals. Tolerant of light frost. Use slow-release fertilizer and mulch with wood chips (keeping clear of trunk). Tip prune young plants and prune back after flowering. Suit coastal gardens. Suited to subtropical climates.
Callistemon var. salignus Callistemon 'Eureka'- violet rose form A bright new colour in bottle brushes - a vibrant red suffused with rich purple tonings and golden stamens peeping through. As bush grows the new growth is upright and is a coppery red colour several times a year. Ideal for hedges. Attracts honeyeaters. Plant in any sunny spot as specimens, hedges or in shrubberies. 
Callistemon viminalis "Wildfire" A recommended variety of bottlebrush that combines beautiful soft green weeping foliage with a spectacular display of bright red bottlebrush flowers. Will also produce occasional flowers at other times of the year. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. Attracts Pale-headed Rosella. Very hardy plant that will grow in most soils and conditions including wet and very dry.
Callistemon viminalis Callistemon Rose Opal This bottlebrush has shiny green leaves and a weeping habit. It grows to 1.5 metres x 1 metre and flowers throughout the year with intense flushes in Spring and Autumn. Flowers provide nectar and seed for Rosellas and Lorikeets. A very adaptable plant that prefers a sunny, well-drained moist soil.
Callistemon viminalis 'Hannah Ray' 'Hannah Ray' The loveliest of all bottlebrushes with a magnificent display of spring flowers and masses of weeping, pink-tipped growth. The pendulous flowers are outstanding in size and colour. A lovely small tree for garden or footpath. Attracts nectar -feeders (birds, insects). Very hardy plant that will grow in most soils and conditions including wet and very dry. Will tolerate only light frosts.
Callistermon salignus Willow bottlebrush Attractive weeping tree to about 8m. New growth an attractive coppery colour. Flowers usually yellow but pink forms available. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. Attracts Rainbow Lorikeets. An extremely adaptable plant for a wide range of soils and conditions. Will grow well near the coast.
Callitris gracilis (was called C.preissii) Southern Cypress-pine A tree that grows to 5-7 metres or sometimes more. Galahs and cockatoos eat seeds. Leaf secretions are eaten by honeyeaters and wattlebirds. Small insects in canopy provide food for thornbills, wrens and treecreepers. Plant also provides perching for owls, kites, red capped robins and possums; hollows shelter bats. Lizards hide under debris. Deep sandy soils with woodlands, mallee open scrub or shallow limestone soils.
Calothamnus quadrifidus One-sided Bottlebrush A variable shrub which forms from ground cover to 2 metre shrub. Red brush flowers in winter/spring. This plant only flowers for two months, but it is very appealing to nectar seeking birds. Any garden conditions - can be pruned very hard.
Canarium australasicum Canirium australasicum Large flowering deciduous (male and female) tree growing to 15-25 metres high. Has a spreading crown, slightly scaling pinnate leaves to 30cm. True bark is smooth. Image not available. Attracts Pied Imperial Pigeons and Palm Cockatoos. Can be grown from fresh chipped seed.
Carpentaria acuminata Darwin Palm A palm growing to 15-30 metres high. Single trunked dropping branches. The bark is hard and rough. Flowers are large white to pale yellow. Fruit is smooth globular wooding. Torres Strait Pigeons and Orange Palm Darts are attracted to this plant. Can be grown from fresh seed.
Cassia queenslandica Cassia Grows very well in warm temperate climates. Full sun for best flowering. Attracts Tailed Emperor butterflies (Polyura sempronius) and Grass Yellow butterflies. Grows very well in Brisbane. Full sun for best flowering.
Casuarina equisetifolia Coastal She-oak Tall graceful spreading tree growing to 10-20 metres high with opened branched crown and weeping branchlets. Partly deciduous dark greying bark which is rough and hard. Attracts lorikeets and Red-tailed Black Cockatoos. Foliage shelters other birds. Excellent for seaside planting. Can be grown from seed.
Chamelaucium uncinatum 'Purple Pride' Geraldton Wax Open spreading shrub with leaves that are small and needle like. Flowers in spring with purple flowers. Grows to 2 metres high and 2 metres wide. Provides nectar for insects including butterflies. Light well drained soil. Do not over water. Full sun. Copes with light to moderate frosts.
Chrysocephalum apiculatum Golden Buttons Suckering low ground cover that often forms broad clumps. Has narrow oblong leaves that are green above and silvery hairy below. For most of the year the small buttony golden everlastings are produced in clusters at ends of erect stems. Butterflies collect nectar. Foodplant for Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa kershawi). Native budworm moth food plant. Easy to grow, best in sun or semi-shade. Shear to just above ground level in late winter/early spring to promote excellent growth/flowering.
Cissus antarctica Kangaroo Vine A strong twining plant with handsome, serrated green leaves. Nice for a large trellis, or covering a fence. Attracts Hawkmoths. Popular climber. Grows well in shade and likes composted, moist soil in warm position.
Citriobatus pauciflorus Orange Thorn Bush Stiff, much-branched, spiny shrub with white tubular flowers followed by orange berries. Attracts Bright Copper moths (Paralucia aurifer). Hardy plant in well-shaded position. Can be grown from seed. Likes moist soils, however grows in most soil types.
Citrus australasica (formerly Microcitrus australasica) Native Finger Lime Small tree growing to 5 metres. Leaves are ovate and flowers are white. Fruits are cylindrical to 6 cm long. Image not available. Attracts Capaneus Swallowtail butterflies, also Dainty Swallowtail and Orchard Swallowtail butterflies. Grow in frost-free areas in richly composted soils. Fruits are edible & may be eaten raw or made into a pleasant tasting marmalade.
Citrus garrawayae (formerly Microcitrus garrawayae) Native Lime Small tree growing to 5 metres. Fruits are like a small lemon to 6 cm long. Pleasant flavour. Image not available. Attracts Capaneus Swallowtail butterflies, also Dainty Swallowtail, Orchard Swallowtail and Ambrax Swallowtail. Appears to be very slow growing. Fruits make a pleasant drink.
Clematis aristata Old man's beard Twining climber trifoliate with green leaf. Large white star flowers in spring/summer. Fluffy seed heads. Moths use as a larvae plant food - (Chloroclystic destructata; Cryptophla immersana; and Phrissogonus laticostata). Prefers moist, sheltered areas.
Clematis microphylla Small-leaf clematis A small-leafed climber that develops into a dense mass of foliage. The four petalled cream flowers, about 4cm across, are produced during late winter and spring. Can be profuse. The fluffy seed head of female plants are beautiful when backlit by sunshine. Butterflies collect nectar. Birds can use seed heads for nesting material. May be used as nesting sites for birds or Ringtailed Possums. Hoverflies visit flowers for nectar. (Indigenous people used roots which were pounded for high amounts of starch). Adapts well to cultivation. Needs growing support otherwise it will be a groundcover.
Conostylis candicans Grey cottonheads Small clumping perennial with grey strap-like leaves and heads of woolly yellow flowers in winter and spring. Grows to approx. 30cm high and forms clumps to approx. 30cm across. Prefers sunny positions. Attracts nectar-eating birds. Requires good drainage. Full sun. Can cope with light to moderate frosts.
Correa calycina Correa Medium shrub growing to 1-2 metres. Green bell shaped flowers. Image shown of similr species. Attracts honeyeaters. Grown in fertile, moist but well-drained soil.
Correa decumbens Native Fuschia Thin tubular red flowers, green-tipped with long protruding stamens. Attracts small honeyeaters. Grows best in fertile, moist, well drained soil. Mature plants tolerate drier soil.
Correa 'Dusky Bells' Native Fuchsia Low spreading shrub with dense foliage. Flowers with Salmon pink bells in winter/spring. Attracts honeyeaters. Light annual prune. Prefers full shade.
Correa pulchella Salmon Correa Low spreading plant growing to 15cm high and .5 metres - 1.5 metres wide. Bears masses of orange bells in autumn through winter. Attracts nectar feeding birds. Parrots eat the flowers too. Grows well in limestone This hardy species will grow in almost any situation providing there is good drainage. Tip prune to help promote bushy growth.
Correa reflexa prostrate form. Common Correa - Prostrate Dense low ground cover growing to 20-50cm high by 1-2 metres wide, with oval to round leathery leaves. Greenish-white bells to about 2 cm long produced during autumn-spring. Has been known wrongly as c reflexa var. nummulariifolia (only access on Kangaroo Island) and is still sold under that name by many nurseries. Butterflies gather nectar. Attracts nectar feeding birds. Skinks like to eat the flowers. Very adaptable ground cover which can be pruned very hard. Tolerates some alkalinity. Tolerates shade.
Correa spp. Native Fuchsia Ground cover and small shrub. Wonderful bell flowers in autumn/winter. Range of colours from cream/salmon and pink. Haven for lizards. Honeyeaters feed on nectar-rich flowers. Hardy and attractive small shrubs and ground covers with bell-shaped flowers.
Crowea exalata Edna Walling Crowea™ This plant is a selected form of Crowea exalta A small arching shrub (30-45cm x 80cm-1.2m) with fine aromatic foliage and masses of multi-hued pink star flowers from summer to autumn and early winter. The prefix Edna Walling denotes this selection as representative of the style of plants which Edna Walling, the noted Australian garden designer of the mid-1900s, could have used in present-day gardens. Attracts native bees and insects and is therefore a useful source of food for small foraging birds such as scrub wrens. Loves full sun or light shade, growing in both coastal and inland situations; frost tolerant. Very suitable for dry conditions, flowering for an extended period with minimal attention. A lovely container plant, or as a cottage garden selection; will also cascade over banks and walls with charming effect. Requires only light trimming after flowering. Feed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer.
Cryptocarya triplinervis Brown Laurel Tree growing to 8 metres with bushy habit to 3 metres wide. Bears large heads of small black berries. Host plant for Blue Triangle butterflies (Graphium sarpedon) as well as Banded Dusk-flat, Macleay's Swallowtail and Bronze Flat butterflies. The fruits are eaten by all-fruit eating birds and Australian King Parrots. Best in full sun. Makes a good shade tree. Excellent when included in a wind- break or shelter belt.
Cupaniopsis anacardioides Tuckeroo Evergreen shade tree with a rounded cone. Grows to 10 metres high with a spread of 3 metres. Attracts many butterflies - Felder's Line-blue (Prosotas felderi); Hairy Line-blue (Erysichton); Large Purple Line-blue (Nacaduba berenice); White-banded Line-blue (N. Kurava); Common Pencilled Blue (Candalides absimilis); Fiery Jewel (H. ignita ignita); Black-spotted Flash (Hypolycaena phorloas); Bright Cornelian (deudorix diouis); Dark Ciliated -blue (Anthene seltuttus); Pale Ciliated-blue (A. lycaenoides); and Glistening Blue (Sahulana scintillato). Thrives on well drained, sandy soil in open, sunny position. Tolerates moderate exposure to salty winds.
Cymbopogon ambiguus Lemon Scent Grass Tufted perennial grass forming erect, leafy tussocks. Bluish green leaves which give off a strong lemon or citron odour when crushed. Very attractive. Image of similar form plant. Grazed by kangaroos and wallabies, etc. Clumps provide habitat for skinks and small lizards. Very hardy and easy to propagate by dividing plants. Lemon scented foliage. Not known if frost tolerant.
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Dampiera diversifolia Blue Eyes Spreading and suckering plant growing to 1 metre across. Non invasive. Dark green foliage is covered in masses of violet-blue flowers from June through to December. Attracts Grass Dart Butterflies and other insects including native bees. Responds readily to pruning. A little light shade gives best results, although full sun is suitable if ample moisture available. Can cope with light to moderate frosts.
Danthonia caespitosa Common Wallaby Grass Robust tussocky perennial grass. Flower spikes to 70 cm. Attracts the Superb Parrot as well as lizards, skinks, insects and seed-eating parrots (Red-rumped Parrot). Tolerates frost, likes well-drained soils and sunny position.
Danthonia tenuior Wallaby Grass Tussock grass growing to 50cm - 1 metre high with attractive flowerheads during spring to early summer. Attracts finches, other seed-eating birds including Blue-winged Parrots and Rosellas. Wombats graze on this plant. Also attracts lizards (skinks). Sunny situation in well drained soil. Consult your Flora for Fauna Nursery for information on local species and most appropriate species to grow.
Darwinia citriodora Seaspray A low mounding shrub (10cmx50-90cm) with silvery green aromaticfoliage, dense and very attractively set on fine stems. Vivid orange-red bracted flowers cover the leaves from winter to summer. Honeyeaters, native bees and butterflies all feed on the nectar. This is a fast-growing and effective ground cover in small or large gardens as a path edging plant, in rockeries or in containers on patios or decks. Small honeyeaters such as Eastern Spinebills and New Holland Honeyeaters are attracted to the bright flowers. native bees and insects and insects also gather pollen and are a source of food for wrens and flycatchers. Loves full sun or light shade in temperate to sub-tropical climates in well-drained clay or sandy loams with neutral to acid pH. Excellent for coastal gardens. Tolerates moderate frosts. Requires only light trimming for shape, after flowers have finshed. Feed with low phosphorous controlled release fertiliser in early Spring or late Summer.
Decaspermum humile Silky Myrtle Tall shrub or small tree to 10m with attractive foliage. Broad shiny leaves. Flowers are small and white followed by berries. Attracts nectar-feeding butterflies. Easily cutivated in well composted soils. Attractive foliage.
Dianella caerulea Flax-Lily or Paroo Lily Lily-like clumping plant growing to approximately 50cm high and 50cm wide, with bright blue flowers and iridescent blue fruit borne on tall spikes which extend up to 1metre high. Birds relish the fruit. Provides excellent shelter for frogs. Attracts Large Dingy Skipper butterflies and Dingy Grass Skipper (Toxidia peron) butterflies. A good border plant around garden edges. Excellent in rockeries sun or shade.
Dianella congesta Dune Flax Lily Compact and clumping plant with creeping underground stems. Image shown of similar species. Attracts Large Dingy Skipper butterflies. Can grow in most situations but likes some shade and moisture.
Dianella revoluta Spreading Flax-Lilly Compact and clumping plant with creeping underground stems. Fruit taken by birds such as Singing, Spiny-Cheeked and White Eared honeyeaters, Turquoise Parrot and Silvereyes. Lizards eat seeds e.g. Shingleback and Bluetongue. Can grow in most situations but likes some shade and moisture.
Dianella species Flax Lilly An upright tufting and clumping plant which produces spikes of flowers growing to 1 metre high. Grown for the magnificent show of purple berries after flowering. Birds eat the berries. Frogs find shelter in this plant. Hardy plants but likes some shade and moisture. Can be grown from seed or plants can be divided.
Dianella tasmanica Tasman Flax-lily Robust tufting lily with arching strap leaves. Small blue flowers followed by indigo berries. Good with water and/or shade. Birds eat the berries. Bowerbirds collect berries. Frogs find shelter in this plant. Very hardy. Likes moist soils in cool position. Will spread by rhizomes.
Diploglottis australis Australian Native Tamarind Evergreen tree with tall straight trunk and brownish red bark. Bears tiny yellow flowers in spring and bright orange, grape-sized fruits, which are edible. Fruit eaten by birds. Grows best in warm subtropical areas. Large round fruits can be eaten raw or used for jam.
Doryanthes excelsa Gymea Lily Clumping plant with wide thick leaves 1-2 metres long. Deep red flowers are carried on a spear like stalk up to 4 metres high, occurring during spring and early summer. Abundant supply of nectar attracts many birds. Small insects are attracted to flowers and hence insectivorous birds can be seen around plant. Well drained soils in partial to full sun. Foliage is frost tolerant but flowers easily damaged by frost.
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Elaeocarpus reticulatus Blueberry Ash A small tree with conical shape. Masses of fragrant pink flowers cover the tree in early summer. Brilliant blue berries cover the tree for many months. Fallen berries are eaten by pigeons and possibly lizards. This is a rainforest tree. it is best suited to coastal regions from Sydney to Rockhampton. It will grow in shade or semi shade but prefers well drained soil.
Epacris longiflora Fuschia Heath Small straggly evergreen shrub growing to 1 metre. Suited to rockery or container. Red tubular flowers have white tips. Flowering for most of the year but mainly winter to early summer. Attracts butterflies. Will tolerate heavy shade.Needs very well drained soils. Prune regularly to keep compact.
Eremophila alternifolia Narrow-leafed Emu Bush Medium-size shrub (2.5 metres) with narrow green leaves. Flowers in Spring with colours ranging from white to yellow, pink and purple. Honeyeaters sip nectar from tubular flowers. Suitable for pot cultivation but does extremely well if planted in garden beds. Responds well to tip pruning. Minimal watering required. Grows best in full sun and should not be fertilised.
Eremophila biserrata Prostrate eremophila Ground cover with green serrated leaves. Green tubular flowers have a reddish upper lip. Flowrs in Spring-Summer. Honeyeaters sip nectar from flowers. Grows best in full sun or part shade. Requires only minimal watering and no fertiliser.
Eremophila calorhabdos Red Rod An unusual and beautiful Eremophila with vertical branches growing to 2m. Flowers are mostly pink to red and flowers appear between July and February. This plant is tolerant of frost and drought. Plant requires minimal watering and should not be fertilised. Grows best in full sun or partial shade.
Eremophila cv Red Spotted Yellow Winter Gold A dense, bright green shrub usually reaching 1 metre with a spread of 1-2 metres. Flowers are bright yellow and tubular, up to 30 mm long with red spotted throat. Flowers profusely in June and July. Honeyeaters will feed from flowers, Blue tongue lizards will eat fallen flowers. As with most Eremophilas, this is a tough, adaptable ornamental plant which thrives in most soils, preferring loam or clay. Needs good drainage. Should not be fertilised and requires very little watering.
Eremophila decipens Eremophila Compact and hardy shrub reaching 1 metre all over. Green leaves with red flowers appearing August to January. Honeyeater eaters sip nectar from flowers. Likes full sun or dappled sunlight. Is frost and drought hardy.
Eremophila denticulata Fitzgerald Eremophila A small shrub of 1-2 metres. Dark green leaves with red tubular flowers. Flowers sporadically between September and March. This plant is listed as an endangered species. Honeyeaters. Full sun, no fertiliser and minimal watering.
Eremophila glabra Glabra Tormentosa Grey-leafed plant with red flowers, very hardy plant. Honeyeaters visit flowers for nectar. Blue tongue lizards eat the fallen flowers. Hardy and low maintenance plant. Requires full sun, minimal watering and no fertiliser.
Eremophila glabra Glabra Roseworthy Green leafed ground cover with red tubular flowers. Is mat-like in growth spreading to a circle approx 2 metres in diameter. Honeyeaters are attracted to the tubular flowers. Blue-tongued lizards enjoy eating the flowers once they die and drop off the plant. Prefers full sun. Does not require fertiliser and needs only minimal watering.
Eremophila glabra Kalbarri Carpet Grey-leafed form of Eremophila glabra that reaches around 10 cm in height and spreads to approx 2 metres in diameter. Yellow flowers in profusion in winter, carrying through to Spring. Honeyeaters sip nectar from tubular flowers and Blue-tongue lizards will eat the fallen flowers. Low maintenance plant requiring minimal water and no fertiliser.
Eremophila maculata Emu Bush Very hardy, compact shrub ranging in height from 0.5 m to 3m. Flowers can be red, orange, pink and plum. Widely available and is the most commonly known Eremophila. Usually flowers between May and November. Honeyeaters are attracted to flowers and lizrads enjoy eating fallen flowers and sheltering beneath shrub. Position so plant receives full sun. Most forms are resistant to disease, dry periods and frost. Minimal watering required and should not be fertilised.
Eremophila maculata (var. brevifolia) Lipstick Plant A low, dense, small shrub normally about 70 cm in height and 1 m across. Leaves are round. Red flowers cover plant from late Autumn to early Summer. Honeyeaters feed from flowers and Blue-tongue lizards feed on fallen flowers. This colourful dwarf form of E. maculata adapts well to most soils, particularly limestone. Being from the arid/semi-arid regions, it can take extra water if given during the summer months. Does need water during winter.
Eremophila virens Eremophila virens Medium to tall shrub, erect and slender reaching up to 5 metres in height. Flowers are tubular and have a green 'frosted' appearance due to hairs on the outer surface. Flowers appear from June-September. Grows particularly well in metropolitan Adelaide and on granitic soils. Listed as Threatened Species. Is available from Goodwinii Nursery, SA. Honeyeaters sip nectar from flowers. Grows best with minimal watering and no fertiliser.
Eremophila youngii   This large shrub grows to 3 metres in height and has attractive green/grey foliage. Attractive pink flowers appear in Winter. Honeyeaters will sip nectar from flowers. Grows well in a range of soils. Best in full sun. Copes with dry periods and some frosts.
Eriostemon buxifolius ' Cascade of Stars' Cascade of Stars Evergreen small shrub. Leaves are small, crowded, flat and leathery, greyish/green in colour. Pink buds and white star-like flowers in spring. Grows to 40 cm high and 40 cm wide. Attracts butterflies and other insects. Needs well drained soil and full sun.
Eriostemon myoporoides Long-leaf Wax Flower Scented, dark green, eliptic leaves set off pink buds that open to white, star shaped waxy flowers. Attracts Ground Parrot. Very reliable garden shrub. Will grow in full sun to semishade. Requires reasonable drainage. Prune lightly after flowering.
Eucalyptus burdettiana Burdett Gum Grows to 5 metres. Green flowers and a dome-topped pad. Image of related species. Attracts nectar-feeding birds and seed-eating Parrots. Will grow well in areas of low rainfall.
Eucalyptus caesia Silver Princess Small open weeping tree growing to 10 metres high and 4 metres wide. Silver-white trunk and hanging clusters of large pink-red flowers from early winter through spring. Juvenile foliage is large and heart shaped. Mature foliage is sickle shaped. Parrots including Ring Necks, Rainbow Lorikeets and Crimson Rosellas, love taking off the flowers. This plant also attracts honeyeaters and seed eating birds. Hardy, easily grown tree suiting most soil types and positions. Can be pruned to shape and may require staking when young.
Eucalyptus curtisii Plunkett Mallee Small tree growing to 7 metres. Clusters of cream flowers - suitable for small gardens. Good street tree. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. Very hardy and reliable.
Eucalyptus dives Broad-leaved peppermint One of the smaller eucalypts - smooth bark, blue/grey foliage. Profuse cream winter flowers. Gang-gang Cockatoos, Purple-crowned Lorikeets and Crimson Rosellas and Sugar Gliders are attracted to this plant. Grows on most soils and is frost hardy. Aromatic leaves smell of peppermint.
Eucalyptus erythrocorys Red capped gum - Illyarie Small to medium tree with deep green foliage and profusion of yellow flowers in flushes mainly February and May. Flower buds have vibrant red cap and the contrast between cap and flower is highly regarded. Juvenile foliage is soft and crinkled. Various Lorikeets are attracted to this gum. Can be frost tender when young. Can be pruned very hard if required.
Eucalyptus erythronema White Mallee, Red Flowered Mallee Small to medium tree with typical mallee form. Prolific flowers. Flowers attract insects and honeyeaters. Parrots love seeds. Suited to most conditions in dry or semi-dry locations.
Eucalyptus ficifolia Red flowering gum Small tree with masses of flowers covering the plant in summer. Flower colour can range from soft pink, salmon, orange to bright red due to seed grown varieties. There are now grafted varieties being grown and sold through garden centres proving very popular (these are hybrid forms). Attracts Musk Lorikeets, Purple-crowned Lorikeets Red-Capped Parrot, Swift Parrot. Spiders and earwigs lodge in the gum nuts. Likes well drained soil and light textured soil. Thrives in coastal areas with some protection from strong salty winds. Will not tolerate frosts.
Eucalyptus forrestiana Fuschia Gum Small busy tree growing to 2-4 metres high with yellow flowers and red pods. Flowers attract nectar-feeding birds and seeds attract parrots. Sunny position required. Can cope with drought but is frost-tender when young.
Eucalyptus intermedia Pink Bloodwood Medium to large tree to 35m. Bears large clusters of fruit. Image of related species. Attracts Scaly-breasted lorikeets and Pale-headed Rosellas. Will grow best near coast in warm and humid parts of Australia. Reliable in most soils.
Eucalyptus leucoxylon Whitewood Hardy tree growing to 8 metres high. Too large for most gardens. Red pink or white flowers. Nectar attracts honeyeaters and seeds attract parrots. Gang-gang Cockatoos, Musk Lorikeets, Purple-crowned and Little Lorikeets are also attracted to this plant. Very hardy in most soils. Can tolerate, drought, frost and wind. Highly regarded as a honey tree.
Eucalyptus leucoxylon (dwarf selection) Euky Dwarf™ A slender small tree (6m x 3-5m) with light open crown of narrow foliage, and massed pink, red or sometimes cream blossom from winter to summer. The prolific blossom is extremely attractive to honeyeaters and to native bees and insects. Especially attractive to small honeyeater species, and to nectar-eating parrots such as lorikeets. It also attracts native bees and insects, therefore attracting insect eating species such as wrens and flycatchers. Prolific nectar flow also provides food for small flower-eating possums such as Ringtails. Grows well in full sun or light shade, is extremely frost hardy, and suited to both inland and coastal gardens. It is well suited to streetscape planting, to massed grouping in open parkland or large gardens, and is a perfect small tree for gardens of limited space. Its attraction to honeyeaters especially ranks it as one of the best trees for any garden. Needs no pruning, but should be fed in early spring or late summer with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer. Prefers well drained clay or loam soils with neutral to acid pH.
Eucalyptus leucoxylon (ssp.megalocarpa) SA Blue Gum Medium tree that grows to 5 to 8 metres. Provides pollen and nectar for honeyeaters, bees, lorikeets, Gliding Possums and other Possums. Nectar attracts honeyeaters and seeds attract parrots. Gang-gang Cockatoos, Musk Lorikeets, Purple-crowned and Little Lorikeets and Swift Parrots are also attracted to this plant. Antechinus feed on the insects attracted to tree. Very hardy in most soils. Can tolerate drought, frost and wind.
Eucalyptus macrandra Long-flowered Marlock Likes to grow near coast or estuaries. Hardy. Butterflies collect nectar. Attracts nectar feeding birds, insect eating birds, and seed eaters including cockatoos and rosellas. Spiders live under loose bark.
Eucalyptus maculata Spotted Gum Tall, fast growing large tree, suited to parks and highways. White flowers in compound clusters. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. Birds that are attracted to this plant include Swift Parrot, Musk Lorikeets, Little Lorikeets, Scaly-breasted Lorikeets, Pale-headed Rosellas and Gang-gang Cockatoos. Will grow well in most well-drained soils. Grows well along coast but is also hardy in dry areas. Is moderately frost resistant.
Eucalyptus mannifera (dwarf form) Little Spotty™ A small slender tree (5-7m tall) with a smooth waxy trunk spotted with cream or red patches, and a graceful canopy of fine grey-green foliage. Masses of creamy nectar-rich flowers bloom from winter to summer. Rich blossom is attractive to all honeyeater species, and to insects and native bees, therefore providing a food source for wrens, flycatchers and robins. Prefers an open sunny position or light shade, tolerates heavy frosts and is extremely drought hardy. May be grown as a copse in landscapes of large scale, or as a specimen or small cluster in confined spaces. Its smooth trunk and graceful habit create a lovely picture, and need only simple underplanting of grasses or fine heathland species to complete the effect. It is well suited to streetscape planting.
Eucalyptus melliodora Yellow Box Tall graceful tree with weeping branches and narrow leaves. The tree is valued for its delicately scented flowers and high yield of honey. Attracts many kinds of insects to nectar including honey bees and butterflies. Birds that are attracted to this plant include Superb Parrot, Crimson Rosellas, Eastern Rosellas, Musk Lorikeets, Swift Parrots, Rosellas; Gang-gang and Sulphur-crested Cockatoos; Rainbow Lorikeets, Little Lorikeets, Swift Parrots and Red-rumped Parrots. Very hardy in most soils. Can withstand periods of drought and is frost resistant.
Eucalyptus pauciflora selected dwarf form Edna Walling Little Snowman™ A small slender tree (4-7 m x 3-4 m) with a smooth creamy white trunk, an open pendulous canopy of grey green leaves and masses The prefix Edna Walling denotes this selection as representative of the style of plants which Edna Walling, the noted Australian garden designer of the mid-1900s, could have used in present-day gardens. A tree with attraction to many forms of wildlife. Crimson Rosellas especially will seek the seed from the gumnuts, honeyeaters spend hours amongst the summer blossom, and insect eating birds will forage endlessly for food as the flowers are visited by bees, butterflies and other insects. Thrives in full sun or light shad, is extremely frost hardy and will tolerate coastal situations very well. It is perfect for small gardens or streetscapes, either planted singly or in copses, and is especially lovely when set amongst a few well placed rocks and underplanted with simple grasses. It requires minimal maintenance, and may be lightly fed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer if necessary. Likes moist well-drained clay or sandy loams with a neutral to acid pH.
Eucalyptus ptychocarpa Swamp Bloodwood/Gove Gum A small gum tree growing to 8 metres high with huge heads of showy red flowers. Attracts a large range of butterflies. The flowers, which bear copious amounts of nectar, attract honeyeaters and lorrikeets including Red-tailed Black-Cockatoo and Varied Lorikeet. A small gum tree suitable for home gardens. Needs full sun.
Eucalyptus sideroxylon Mugga, Red Ironbark Medium-sized tree to 25m with black, deeply furrowed bark (iron bark). Leaves are grey and flowers are cream, pink or red. Important plant for birds - honeyeaters take insects and nectar, parrots take seeds and flowers. The birds that are attracted to this plant include Eastern Rosellas, Musk Lorikeets, Purple-crowned Lorikeets, Ringneck Parrot, Red-Capped Parrot, Swift Parrot and Turquoise Parrot. Antechinus feed on attracted insects. Attractive tree. Grows in most well-drained soils. Will tolerate extended hot and dry periods and frosts. A good shade tree for large gardens.
Eucalyptus spathulata Eucalyptus spathulata Small tree to around 7m with narrow leaves and shiny trunk. Attracts honeyeaters and parrots. Small tree that grows well in most soils. Needs full sun.
Eucalyptus torquata Coral Gum Ornamental small tree with blue/grey leaves, bark and a dark grey trunk. Distinctive buds hanging in clusters with pointed caps, opening to fluffy red, pink flowers. Grows to 10metres high and 2-3 metres wide. Honeyeaters and seed eating birds including the Purple-crowned Lorikeet, are attracted to this plant. Needs light-medium soil and an open sunny aspect. Susceptible to extreme cold.
Eucalyptus wandoo Wandoo Strong tree growing to more than 10 metres high with patchy white bark and yellow flowers in winter. Attracts Silvereyes that east lerps on the foliage. Grows best in rich sands (well mulched).
Eucryphia lucida Leatherwood White flowering small tree. Famous for the honey produced from its flowers. Image shows related species. Many insects are attracted to blossums including honeybees and butterflies. Also attracts honeyeaters. Very reliable. Prefers well composted soil and plenty of shade.
Evodiella muelleri Little Evodia A tall shrub that grows to around 5 metres. Has deep pink/red flowers along branches. Pale green fruits. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. Food plants for the Ulysses Butterfly. Grows well in open sunny position. Is frost tender.
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Ficus benjamina Weeping fig Broad spreading 10-15 metre tree with weeping branches and foliage, producing aerial roots. Bark is smooth and pale grey. Leaves alternate smooth. Pale grey flowers which are very small and the male and female are separate. The whole ecosystem interacts with this tree. Attracts Common Crow butterfly (Euploea core). Figbirds, Bowerbirds, Orioles and Currawongs are also attracted to this plan. Other visitors include the the Pied Imperial Pigeon and the Double-eyed Fig-parrot. Can be grown from seed and from cuttings. Thrives in rich soil with plenty of moisture. Frost tender and needs protection from strong winds.
Ficus coronata River Sandpaper Fig Medium tree growing to 15 metres. Very rough foliage, reminiscent of sandpaper. Attracts Purple or Common Moonbeam butterflies (Philirus innotatus) and Common Crow butterflies (Euploea core). Grows best in rich moist soil. When grown indoors, may need pruning to maintain shape.
Ficus obliqua Small-leaved Fig Large, spreading tree to 15 m. Small leaves. Small yellowish fruit. Attracts Common Crow butterflies (Euploea core) and No-brand Crow, Alcathoe Crow and Eichhorn's Crow butterfly (Euploea alcathoe). Birds that are attracted to this plant include White-headed Pigeon, Rose-crowned Fruit Dove, Rosellas, Topknot Pigeon.
Flindersia australis Australian Teak; Crow's Ash Tall tree with pinnate leaves with 3-13 elliptical leaflets. Bears sprays of white flowers. Fruits open into five boat-shaped segments. Attracts Orchard Swallowtail Butterflies. Excellent park or street trees. Grows best in rich well drained soil with good water supply. Is moderately frost resistant.
Flindersia schottiana Cudgerie Fragrant flowers and fruits. Image shows related species. Attracts Orchard Swallowtail butterflies. Plant in well drained position in rich soil. Needs frequent watering. Is moderately frost resistant. Good street tree.
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G. pteridifolia x G. banksii Grevillea 'Honey Gem' An exciting new Grevillea flowering all the year round. The flowers are laden with honey and last well in floral arrangements. One of the best Grevilleas for nectar feeding birds such as honeyeaters and lorikeets. Although large aggressive honeyeaters such as wattlebirds tend to frighten smaller honeyeaters when feeding. Can be pruned, after main flowering in early spring, back to half its height if desired. Height about 2.5 metres.
Gahnia sieberiana Red Fruited Saw Sedge Large tussocking plant with sharp-edged dark green leaves. Prominent terminal panicles of flowers produced in spring and summer followed by small brownish red fruits. Grows to 3 metres high and 3 metres wide. Perfect replacement for Pampas Grass!! Host plant for Sword grass brown butterflies. Other butterflies that are attracted include Toxidia peron; Signeta tymbophora; Oreisplanus perornata; Hesperilla ornata; H. Crypsorgyra; H. idothea; H. donnysa; H. Chrysotricha; Antipodia choastola; Tisiphone abeona, T. helena. Other butterflies feed on flower nectar. Attracts seed eating birds such as finches, rosellas and parrots. Native rats eat leaf bases. Needs long periods of wetness for best results. Good for sunny or shaded sites. Excellent for soil erosion control.
Goodenia humilis Swamp Goodenia Matting and suckering plant, with many yellow flowers in spring/summer. Image showns related species. Frogs shelter under mats. Likes to grow in moist conditions. Is frost tolerant.
Goodenia ovata (prostrate form) Edna Walling Coverup™ A dense root-layering, ground carpeting plant spreading to 1.5 metres. Bright green toothed foliage dotted with egg yolk yellow fan flowers most of the year. The prefix Edna Walling denotes this selection as representative of the style of plants which Edna Walling, the noted Australian garden designer of the mid-1900s, could have used in present-day gardens. Attracts insects so provides a useful source of food for insect-eating and foraging birds such as scrub wrens. All the advantages of ivy, and none of the vices. Thrives in full sun or light shade, well suited to either coastal or inland gardens; frost tolerant. Provides an outstanding natural living mulch for garden beds, as well as effective soil binding in soils prone to erosion, or on slopes and banks requiring stabilization. Regular light pruning will maintain fresh new growth. Feed in early spring or late summer with controlled release low phosphorus fertilizer. Dry to well drained or moist clay or sandy loams, neutral to acid or slightly alkaline pH.
Goodenia rotundifolia Star Goodenia Prostrate ground cover that can grow to 50 cm high. Thick, rounded scalloped leaves. Yellow flowers in spring and summer. Attracts Meadow Argus butterflies (Junonia villiola) and Tiger moths. The larvae feed on various Goodenia species. Grows best in a well-drained humus enriched soil. It is frost resistant.
Graptophyllum excelsum Native Fuchsia Medium compact shrub growing to 2 metres high by 1 metre wide. Small green leaves and showy bright red 'fuchsia' type flowers. Very ornamental. Large butterflies (eg Orchard Swallowtails) feed on the nectar in the flowers. Honeyeaters also feed on the nectar in the flowers. Full sun to semi-shade. Suitable for most situations. Can be heavily pruned.
Grevillea acanthifolia x Grevillea monticola Copper Crest™ A low spreading groundcover (2-3m wide) with copper-coloured divided foliage and bronze new growth. Pink toothbrush flowers most of the year, especially spring and summer, especially attractive to honeyeaters. Attractive to all small honeyeater species. Does best in full sun or light shade, is hardy to moderate successive frosts, and suited to both coastal and inland gardens. It is excellent for covering open areas beneath other shrubs, and cascades effectively when used on banks and over walls. It should be pruned following main flowering times, and should be fed in early spring or late summer with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer.
Grevillea alpina 'Grampians' x grevillea rosmarinifolia Jubilee™ A compact upright shrub (1m x 1m) with dense dark green fine foliage and showy bunches of waxy golden red flowers in late winter to summer. Caution: One of the parent plants of Jubilee of Jubilee is Grevillea rosmarinifolia which is considered a weed in some parts of the country. There is no evidence however that Jubilee is a weed. Attractive to all small honeyeaters, notably New Holland, Eastern Spinebills and White Plumed. Thrives in full sun or light shade, withstands heavy frosts. Ideal for low neat hedging in narrow areas of the garden, or attractive as massed planting; a stunning container plant for courtyard or patio. Feed in early spring or late summer with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer, and prune to shape after flowering. Trim regularly if used as a hedge. Prefers well-drained soil with a neutral to acid pH.
Grevillea alpina 'Grampians' x rosmarinifolia Bonnie Prince Charlie™ A compact dwarf shrub (60cm x 1m in ground, 40cm x 60cm in container); dense dark linear foliage, showy bunches of waxy red-and-gold flowers in spring and summer, with an autumn flowering not unusual. Caution: One of the parent plants of Bonnie Prince Charlie is Grevillea rosmarinifolia which is considered a weed in some parts of the country. There is no evidence however that this hybrid is weedy. Especially attractive to small honeyeaters such as Eastern Spinebill, New Holland Honeyeater, White Plumed Honeyeater etc. May be grown as a spectacular low hedge; as an accent plant in a small garden; or as a striking container plant. In ground: must be grown in well drained clay or sandy loams, neutral to slightly acid. In container: must have free draining slightly acid potting medium. Requires full sun to flower at its best, but will tolerate light shade. Requires light trimming after flowering; feed with controlled release low phosphorus fertilizer in early spring or late summer. Suited to coastal and inland gardens, frost tolerant.
Grevillea alpina x lanigera Edna Walling Softly Softly™ A compact little shrub (30-40cm x 35-55cm) with soft grey-green foliage, and showy bunches of pink and cream flowers from late summer through winter to spring. The prefix Edna Walling denotes this selection as representative of the style of plants which Edna Walling, the noted Australian garden designer of the mid-1900s, could have used in present-day gardens. Especially attractive to small honeyeaters, notably Eastern Spinebills and New Holland Honeyeaters. May be grown in full sun or light shade, in inland or coastal gardens; frost tolerant. Can be grouped in small gardens to soften darker foliaged plants; used as a border plant along pathways; or as a long-flowering container plant in a cottage garden setting. Minimal pruning is required, after flowering. Feed lightly in spring with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer. Do not overwater. If in container, use free draining good quality potting mix.
Grevillea 'Apricot Charm' Grevillea 'Apricot Charm' A medium sized dense shrub that grows up to 1.5 metres tall and 2 metres wide. It has glossy green leaves and pedulous apricot coloured flowers. Parrots, honeyeaters and other birds are attracted to this plant. Prefers a sunny position. Prune lightly after flowering. Frost hardy.
Grevillea arenaria Grevillea arenaria Medium shrub growing to 1-2 metres. Crimson Rosellas are attracted to this plant. Very hardy. Will grow in almost any garden situation. Flowers green or red. Propagate from cuttings.
Grevillea banksii Grevillea 'Kay Williams' Fast growing shrub which has an overall compact shape. Dark green deeply divided foliage is silvery underneath. A profusion of apricot blooms make a long lasting display. Attracts nectar feeding birds. Mulch well around plants avoiding trunks. Trim lightly after flowering if a more compact plant wanted.
Grevillea banksii Bank's Grevillea In Queensland this plant will grow up to five metres tall, in the southern States it usually reaches 2-3 metres. Large fernlike silver green leaves with large red flowers throughout the year but most prolific in spring and autumn. Widely grown in home gardens across Australia. This outstanding shrub has large, nectar rich flowers that attract honeyeaters throughout the year. Parrots and rosellas feed on the seeds. Frost tender and requires a warm, well-drained position.
Grevillea banksii x Grevillea bipinnatifida Grevillea 'Robyn Gordon' Low spreading evergreen shrub, covered with beautiful large red flowers all year. Hardy open position, attractive foliage adds character to any garden. Attrracts Eastern Spinebills and other honeyeaters. Well suited to most gardens but does best in full sun. Excellent bird attracting plant.
Grevillea 'Bedspread' Grevillea 'Bedspread' A fast growing groundcover. Grows upo to 2 metres wide and 300mm high. Toothbrush flowers, mauve/burgundy in colour, appear in Spring-Summer. A wide range of nectar feeding honeyeaters are attracted to this plant. Best planted in an open, sunny position. Frost hardy. Suits most soils - preferably not alkaline.
Grevillea 'Bonfire' Grevillea 'Bonfire' A medium sized evergreen shrub with fine, dark green leaves and masses of fiery red spider flowers during Spring. Grows up to 1.5 metres tall and 2 metres wide. A wide range of nectar feeding honeyeaters are attracted to this plant. Plant in a sunny position. Prune lightly after flowering. Feed with a low phosphorus fertilizer in spring and late summer.Suits most soils - preferably not alkaline.
Grevillea crithmifolia Grevillea crithmifolia Ground cover growing to 40cm high by 2 metres wide. Cream pom pom flowers in spring. Flowers attract insects which in turn attract birds. Hardy plant that likes a well-drained site. Copes with dry periods as well as some frost. Good in coastal areas. Prune to maintain density.
Grevillea 'Ember Glow' Grevillea Hybrid A low spreading shrub 1 metre high by 2 metres across. Flowers for most of the year. Honeyeaters such as Wattlebirds, Eastern Spinebills and Noisy Friarbirds visit this shrub regularly to sip nectar from flowers. Suitable for a wide range of conditions. Prefers full sun to part shade. If necessary, prune in late Spring and fertilise with a low phosphate fertiliser. Will flower prolifically in a large pot or tub.
Grevillea 'Firesprite' Grevillea 'Firesprite' Spectacular hybrid with a bright green deeply lobed foliage which is extremely attractive. Flowers flame red 8-10 cm terminal brushes occurring on and off throughout the year. Grows 2-3 metres high by 2 metres across forming a dense shrub. Image shows realted species. Attracts parrots and honeyeaters. Can be pruned to form a neat rounded shrub. Gorgeous red flowers. Grows well in reasonably drained soils. Excellent screening plant. Likes full sun and regular pruning to maintain shape.
Grevillea hybrid selection Old Gold™ A low mounding dense groundcover (45-65 x 1-1.5m) with golden green holly-like foliage, highlighted by golden new growth. Coral pink flowers cover the plant profusely throughout the year. Exceptional impact when used as massed planting on banks and broad garden beds, and is an attractive container plant for patios and courtyard decoration. Small honeyeaters such as New Holland and Eastern Spinebills are always attracted to the flowers; native bees and insects also feed on the flowers and are therefore a source of food for wrens especially. Best in full sun or light shade, extremely frost tolerant, and may be used in coastal or inland situations. Plants should be tip pruned in spring and summer, and fed with a small amount of low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer. Prefers well drained clay or sandy loams, neutral to slightly alkaline or slightly acid pH.
Grevillea hybrid selection Tangerine™PBR A low spreading dense shrub (30-60cm x 1-1.5m) with compact grey-green foliage and masses of nectar-rich tangerine flowers most of the year, especially in late autumn through to summer. This grevillea is most attractive to Crimson Rosellas, who will feed for hours on the blossoms. Small honeyeaters are equally attracted to the nectar-rich flowers, and small insectivorous birds such as Scrub wrens will frequent the foliage for their share of the feast. Full sun or light shade is suitable, in both coastal and inland garden situations. Extremely frost hardy. May be used as mass plantings on slopes and large garden areas for a spectacular landscape effect, or as a dramatic container plant in large courtyard spaces. It should be pruned to shape as required, and given a light trim on a regular basis to maintain desired spread. An application of controlled release low phosphorus fertilizer is recommended in early spring or late summer.
Grevillea hybrid species Honeybirds "Wattlebird Yellow" This plant has large flowerheads in Golden yellow colour. Grows to around 1 metre. Attracts honeyeaters, insects and small mammals. Needs full sun. Raised beds are useful to assist drainage. Mulching is beneficial. Prefers well drained soils.
Grevillea hybrid species Honeybirds "Parakeet Pink" Produces large paink grevillea flowerheads. This hybrid is bred for dwarfness and grow to around 1.5 m. Nectar produced by the flowers attracts nectar feeding birds, insects and small mammals. Likes full sun. prefers raised beds to assist drainage. Will grow in most soils provided they are well drained.
Grevillea hybrid species Honeybirds "Silvereye Cream" Produces large flowerheads in lemon Cream colour. Grows to around 2 metres. Honey on the flowers attract all nectar feeding birds, insects and small mammals. Prefers full sun, raised beds assist drainage. Keep surrounding soils well mulched. Prefers well drained soils.
Grevillea 'John Evans' Grevillea 'John Evans' A very hardy small to medium shrub with masses of red flowers from late winter to spring. Attracts honeyeaters that feed on nectar. Regulate watering to suit conditions. Responds well to a light pruning.
Grevillea johnsonii & wilsonii - Hybrid Grevillea 'Austraflora Bon Accord' Handsome foliaged evergreen shrub grown for brilliant crimson-red flowers. Long flowering showy grevillea which forms a rounded bush. Image shown of Grevillea johnsonii. Attracts honeyeaters and other nectar feeders. Ensure excellent drainage and mulch well using leaf litter and a little well rotted compost. Avoid rich compost. Relatively new cultivar is tolerant to frost and dry conditions. Ensure excellent drainage. Good screening plant.
Grevillea juniperina prostrate Juniper Grevillea A tall rounded shrub to 2 metres with dark needle-like. Clusters of yellow/orange red flowers appear from late winter through to Spring. Attracts Copper-pencilled Blue butterflies (Candalides cyprotus). Flowers attract honeyeaters and shrub provides shelter for a range of birds. This groundcover likes a well-drained position and grows well in most climates. They tolerate either sun or partial shade and are frost resistant. Should be kept pruned.
Grevillea lavandulacae x Grevillea lanigera Cherry Ripe™ A compact dense shrub (30-50cm x 40-50cm) with soft grey-green foliage and massed bunches of waxy cherry flowers from winter to spring. Especially attractive to all small species of honeyeaters. Grows well in full sun or light shade, is very frost hardy, and is suited to both inland and coastal gardens. It makes an excellent and colourful hedge or specimen plant in the garden, and a showy long-flowering container plant. Trim lightly after flowering, and apply a low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer.
Grevillea lavandulacea Lavender Grevillea Low spreading shrub growing to 1 metre high. White to red flowers produce a wealth of nectar. Nectar eating birds including honeyeaters and spinebills are attracted to this plant. Grows best in a well-drained, light textured soil. Prefers full sun but can grow in partial shade. Plants are frost resistant and some forms will tolerate very cold conditions. Needs regular pruning.
Grevillea longifolia x Grevillea beadleana Grevillea 'Simply Sarah' A hardy low spreading shrub with outstanding grey/green foliage and intense, dark red toothbrush flowers during late winter/spring and summer. Excellent cut foliage for vases. Image shown of Grevillea longifolia. Nectar eating birds including honeyeaters and spinebills are attracted to this plant. Easily grown in well drained situation and tolerant of drying out. Prunes well for lovely screen plant.
Grevillea longistyla x Grevillea johnsonii Grevillea 'Elegance' A grafted plant. Also known as Grevillea 'Long John' in southern states. A bushy, slightly weeping shrub that grows to approx. 3 metres high and 2 metres wide. Covered in very large pink racemes of flowers for long periods winter to spring. An outstanding specimen in the garden or large container. Image shown of Grevillea longistyla. Nectar eating birds including honeyeaters and spinebills are attracted to this plant. Plant in sunny position in most soils. Light pruning in early stages is beneficial. Strong winds may break branches. Propagate from cuttings.
Grevillea obtusifolia 'Gin Gin' Grevillea A glossy leaf grevillea very hardy growing to 30 cm high. Red flowers in winter. Great for cascading and for weed suppression. Spreads to 2-3 metres wide. Provides protection for frogs, lizards. A very versatile plant. Needs well-drained position and does not tolerate frosts. Grows in most soils.Great for cascading. Good plant for suppressing weeds.
Grevillea olivacea "Apricot Glow" Olive-leaf Grevillea A large shrub growing to 2 metres high. This particular cultivar is fast growing, bushy hardy and a fantastic addition to any garden - native or not. Pin wheels of apricot flowers all over the bush. Lovely soft foliage. Flowers attract honeyeaters, other nectar eating birds and insects. Prune at an early stage to keep bushy. Likes alkaline soils. Grows well in areas of heavy winter rainfall.
Grevillea 'Pink Surprise' Grevillea 'Sylvia' Bushy evergreen shrub which flowers most of the year. Fine divided green foliage and large dense pink flowers. Attract nectar feeding birds and parrots. Mulch well to retain soil moisture and suppress weeds. Prune to shape after flowering.
Grevillea 'Poorinda Royal Mantle' Grevillea 'Poorinda Royal Mantle' Vigorous ground hugging grevillea with slightly lobed leaves. Pink-red tooth brush flower heads produced during winter-summer (to about 8cm long). Can spread to 5 metres plus across but plants respond well to pruning. Image shows related species. Many butterflies and Hakea moths collect nectar. Also attracts nectar feeding birds. Acidic soils best. Full sun or semi-shade OK. Subtropical and temperate areas.
Grevillea pteridifolia Fern Leaved Grevillea Slender tree with open crown and silver foliage, growing to 5-8 metres high. Bark rough dark grey to black, furrowed. Flowers bright orange. Fruit hairy, ovoid. Seeds and nectar attract various birds including Varied Lorikeet and Northern Rosella. Grow in sunny well-drained position. Is frost tender. Does not like strong winds. Propagate from cuttings and seed. (Pour hot water over seeds).
Grevillea 'Sandra Gordon' Grevillea 'Sandra Gordon' This cultivar is a hybrid between G.sessilis and G. pteridifolia. This open, dainty shrub has bright yellow flower spikes. Grows to 4 metres. Attract nectar-feeding birds and parrots. Plant in a sunny well-drained position. Is moderately frost resistant and can be grown in coastal areas. Prune after flowering to strengthen plant and produce more compact form.
Grevillea 'Scarlet Sprite' Grevillea 'Scarlet Sprite' New! Fine dainty, brilliant red flowers make this a very showy and superb plant for growing on banks or terraced areas. Attracts nectar feeding birds and butterflies. Plant in a well-drained sunny situation.
Grevillea shiressii Grevillea shiressii Large shrub growing to 2-5 metres. Flowers are a greenish-blue in colour and are in clusters. Attracts Honeyeaters and and other nectar feeders. Rare shrub adapts well to a garden environment. Fast growing screen plant.
Grevillea sp. x G. banksii (hybrid) Grevillea Majestic A tall shrub with outstanding large dense red and cream bird attracting flower spikes through autumn, winter and spring. Image shown is Grevillea Pink Surprise. Flowers produce copius nectar and are very attractive for honeyeaters and lorikeets. Prefers an open sunny position with well drained soil.
Grevillea 'Splendour' Grevillea 'Splendour' A vigorous, evergreen, spreading shrub with attractive large deep green leaves and bronze new growth. Ruby-Red flowers (showy) for most of the year. A very hardy and adaptable plant. Useful hedge or screen shrub. Attracts nectar feeding birds which constantly feed on its showy ruby-red flowers. Will tolerate extended dry periods. Frost tolerant.
Grevillea 'Sunset Bronze' Grevillea 'Sunset Bronze' Produces attractive deep burnt copper/bronze new flowers for most of the year but most prolifically in spring and summer. Ideal for planting in mixed shrubberies. Attracts honeyeaters that feed on nectar. Product of a South Queensland garden. Needs well-drained soil in full sun.
Grevillea 'Superb' Grevillea 'Superb' A low spreading evergreen shrub, 2-3 metres x 2-3 metres with attractive deeply divided foliage and deeply lobed deep green leaves. Bears large reddish orange flowers all year round. Colourful addition to any shrubbery. Ideal screening, hedge or specimen plant. Butterflies and hoverflies collect nectar Nectar feeding birds are attracted to this plant. Cultivate soil before planting. Responds well to pruning. Prune after flowering to promote strong, bushy growth. Best grown in a sunny position. Can be used as a hedge.
Grevillea thelemanniana - (Green and Grey-leaf form) Spider Net Grevillea Low cascading shrub with green or light grey foliage covered in masses of brilliant red spider flowers. Grows to 75cm high and up to 1.2 metres wide in a low cascading mound. Also available as a ground cover. Provides shelter for lizards and insects. Flowers attract nectar feeding birds. Requires reasonable drainage and full sun. Will grow in most soils and responds to pruning. This form is frost tender.
Grevillea thelemanniana ssp. fililoba Ellendale Threatened species - small natural distribution. Grows to 1.2 metres high and 2 metres wide, more if watered. Red flowers autumn to spring. The flowers attract honeyeaters and shrub provides good cover for birds and small animals such as lizards and Antechinus. Fast growing - easy to prune. Can be grown from cuttings or grafted.
Grevillea venusta Byfield Grevillea Evergreen medium tree with unusual flowers of green, yellow, red and black. Attracts nectar feeding birds. Provides shelter for small birds. Requires very well-drained position in full sun or partial shade.
Grevillea victoriae Spider Flower Medium shrub with grey/green foliage. Red flower clusters all year. Attracts nectar feeding birds and insects. Prune annually.
Grevillea victoriae x juniperina prostrate yellow Canterbury Gold A dense spreading shrub (1-1.5m x 2-3m) with soft grey-green linear foliage and bunches of gold flowers from early winter to summer. Extremely attractive to honeyeaters. Well loved by all species of honeyeaters. Grows best in well drained clay loams but is tolerant of all soils except very soggy. Prefers full sun or light shade, is very frost hardy, and is ideal for both coastal and inland gardens. Feed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer, and prune at the same time. Prune more often if used as a hedge.
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Hakea bucculenta Red Pokers Erect shrub with narrow long grass-like leaves. Flowers in late winter and spring with showy orange red spikes. Grows to 4 metres high and 1-2 metres wide. Attracts honeyeaters and nectar feeding birds. Likes light open soils with plenty of drainage. Sunny open aspect. Copes with dry periods and frosts.
Hakea laurina Pin-cushion Hakea Lovely large shrub which can reach small tree dimensions. Dark weeping foliage is contrasted with deep pink to red spherical flowers resembling a pin cushion. Flowering is early winter through to early spring. The Hakea moth and Brown leaf moth are attracted to this plant. Generally one of the easiest to grow hakeas and quite long lived. Can be pruned to shape.
Hakea sericea Nettle bush or Silky Hakea Small to medium stiff nettle foliage with masses of cream to deep pink, sweet scented, flowers in late spring. Provides good shelter for birds. Very hardy and will grow in most situations. Prefers well-drained soils. Is frost tolerant and copes with dry periods.
Happy Duo™ Hardenbergia violacea selected forms A vigorous climbing combination of two forms of Hardenbergia, one the purple Happy Wanderer, the other the white Free 'n Easy selection. Stunning displays of purple and white flowers in early winter to early spring cover the glossy green foliage. It is not unusual to observe Eastern Spinebills seeking nectar from the flowers. Insects and native bees feed also on the flowers, providing a source of food for small foraging birds such as scrub wrens, which constantly hunt amongst the foliage, and also use the network of stems and leaves as safe nesting habitat. Prefers full sun or light shade, and light frosts are tolerated. Coastal or inland gardens are suitable. Hard pruning following flowering is recommended, and occasional trimming during spring and early summer will maintain lush new growth. Feed in early spring or late summer with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer.
Hardenbergia comptoniana Native Wisteria Native Lilac, Wild Sarsaparilla Easily grown climber from bushland areas with masses of pendulous sprays of mauve-blue flowers. Very hardy and will thrive in full sun or dappled light. Leaves are deep green and glossy. Caution: This attractive climber is escaping from gardens in South Australia and becoming established in bushland. Gardeners in this state should avoid choose an alternative climber for their garden. The larvae of the Common Grass-blue butterflies (Zizinia labradus) feed on the plant. Painted acacia moths are attracted to this plant. Provides nesting materials for birds. Tree frogs are also attracted to this plant. Good for attracting native bees. Vigorous climber tolerant of light pruning.
Hardenbergia comptoniana Edna Walling Wild Wisteria™ A climbing or trailing plant of medium vigour with bright green trifoliate leaves, and long sprays of sweetly perfumed dark purple pea flowers from spring to early summer. The prefix Edna Walling denotes this selection as representative of the style of plants which Edna Walling, the noted Australian garden designer of the mid-1900s, could have used in present-day gardens. An excellent source of food for small insect eating and foraging birds such as robins and scrub wrens. Crimson Rosellas enjoy the seed in mid-summer. Loves full sun or light shade, tolerant of mild frosts, and suited to both coastal and inland gardens. Ideal for quick screening of fences, walls, pergolas, or as a carpeting mat beneath shrubbery, or cascading over a wall. Trim as necessary after flowering. Feed in early spring or late summer with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer. Prefers moist, well drained clay or sandy loams with neutral to acid pH.
Hardenbergia violacea Free 'n Easy™PBR A vigorous climbing or trailing plant with glossy dark foliage and delicate long white sprays of pea flowers suffused with lavender pink, blooming from autumn to early spring. A most useful plant in that its flowers provide a nectar source for certain honeyeaters (notably Eastern Spinebills) and are constantly visited by native bees and insects. It is therefore excellent for small foraging birds such as scrub wrens, which will also use the dense foliage and stems as nesting habitat. Loves full sun or light shade, suitable for coastal or inland gardens, tolerant of mild frosts. Use for quick cover of fences, walls or pergolas or as a cascading ground cover on banks and walls. Prune hard after flowering, and trim occasionally during early spring and summer. Feed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer.
Hardenbergia violacea Happy Wanderer Vigorous evergreen climber with purple and white pea flowers. The larvae of the Common Grass-blue butterflies (Zizinia labradus) feed on the plant. Painted acacia moths are attracted to this plant. Provides nesting materials for birds. Tree frogs are also attracted to this plant. Good for attracting native bees. Requires strong frame - prune after flowering.
Harpullia pendula Tulipwood Medium size spreading tree growing to 20 metres. Fruits are two-lobed, yellow or red with large black seeds and occur in winter. The Bright Cornelian butterfly (Deudorix diovis) larvae feed on this plant. Very attractive tree for larger gardens. Suited to most soils in areas of reasonable rainfall. Dislikes frosts.
Hemiandra pungens Snake Bush A low growing matt forming ground cover growing to 10 cm high spreading to 2 metres wide. White or mauve flowers in summer (depending upon the cultivar). Foliage is prickly (but looks soft) so is an excellent shrub for protection for fauna. Protection of lizards Helps skin shedding. Also attracts native bees. Grow in a sunny position with excellent drainage. Prefers light soil and needs protection from frost and winds. Copes with dry periods.
Hibbertia scandens Snake Vine A large strong growing climber with large buttercup yellow flowers in spring. Very vigorous grower. Will climb or can be used as a ground cover. Yellow flowers attract butterflies. Larval food plant for Hawkmoths (Gnathothlibus erotus eras, Hippotion celerio; Theretra oldenlandiae firmata). Eastern rosellas are attracted to this plant. In WA, beetles and native flies are attracted to this plant. Very hardy, requires full sunny position to flower well. Great for coastal gardens.
Hibbertia stellaris Star Guinea Flower Small dainty shrub. Leaves very fine with bronze tips. Vivid orange open flowers in profusion in spring. Grows to 50cm high and 30cm wide. Insects and frogs shelter in this plant. Well drained/sandy soils. Shaded to open sunny aspect.
Hoya australis Common Waxflower, Native Hoya Climber with long twining stems and fleshy green leaves. Umbels of fragrant flowers, one white with a red spot on each lobe occur sporadically. Food plant for common Australian Crow and No-brand crow (Euploea alcatheo) butterflies. In WA, Wesertn Brown and Western Xenica butterflies are attracted to the plant as well as motns during the night. Excellent drainage in positions of semi-shade to full sun. Mulch well. Excellent pot or basket plant.
Hydriastele wendlandiana Hydriastele wendlandiana Slender clumping feather palm growing to 1-15 metres high, trunk 6-12 cm wide. Bark smooth, cream-grey, ringed. Flowers small cream about 0.8cm across. Pigeons such as Pied Imperial-Pigeon eat seeds. Propagate from seed collected in Oct.-Dec. Will withstand wet situations. Can be planted in tubs.
Hymenosporum flavum Native Frangipanni or Wing Seed Tree Slender growing evergreen tree with perfumed white through to yellow flowers. Grows to 6 to 10 metres. Birds eat seeds. Tree frogs use tree for shelter. Rich moist soils, well composted, sheltered position.
Hypocalymma angustifolium White Myrtle A small shrub growing to 1 metre high which has white flowers along the stem. Flowers on the new growth. Scales and lerps feed on this plant. Birds feed on these insects. Prune back hard after flowering to maintain compact growth. Grow in well-drained light soil. Mulch well.
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Indigofera australis Austral indigo Open and spreading shrub growing to 2 metres high. Sprays of purple pea flowers in spring. Plant for larvae of Common grass-blue butterfly (Zizinia Labradus). Responds well to pruning from an early age. Hardy - it will grow in most soils & will flower in shade or sun. Hates very wet soil.
Isolepis nodosa Knobby Club-Rush Densely clumping plant 50cm to 1 metre high by 60cm to 2 metres wide. Globular brownish flower heads. Attracts seed eating birds and small lizards.  Very hardy. Good for binding very sandy soils. Can be used around pools and ponds. Propagate by dividing plants. Ideal for coastasl planting.
Isopogon anemonifolius selected form Woorikee 2000 A dwarf compact shrub (50cm x 50cm) with attractive divided red-tipped foliage and a profusion of golden cone flowers in winter and spring. Attractive to small honeyeaters such as Eastern Spinebill, New Holland Honeyeater and similar species. Thrives in full sun, will tolerate light shade and withstands light frost. Stunning as a container plant, or mass planted in small garden beds for landscape impact. Requires trimming after flowering, and should be fed with controlled release low phosphorus fertilizer in early spring or late summer. Prefers moist, well drained clay or sandy loam with neutral to acid pH.
Isopogon anemonifolius selected form Little Drumsticks™ A small compact upright shrub (30-65cm x 45-80cm) with intricately lobed grey-green foliage. Cone shaped buds develop in summer, opening to globular yellow flowers which cover the plant in winter and spring. Small honeyeaters such as Eastern Spinebills and New Holland Honeyeaters are attracted to the bright flowers. Native bees and insects also gather pollen, and are a food source for wrens and flycatchers. Suited to full sun or light shade, in temperate to semi arid and sub tropical climates. Light frost is tolerated, and the plant is suited to both coastal and inland garden situations. An excellent long flowering container plant, or a striking addition to any garden featuring small select specimens. May also be used as a dramatic hedging choice, requiring only a light trim after flowering to keep it shapely. Flower heads may also be removed as they finish, thus promoting repeat flowering. Controlled release low phosphorus fertilizer may be applied in early spring or late summer.
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Kennedia nigricans Black coral Pea Tough and very vigorous climber with dark green oval shaped leaves, flowers are black with yellow centre appearing in winter and spring. This is one of WA's upside-down flowers. Provides shelter for skinks and insects. In WA, silvereyes and honeyeaters nest in the foliage. Very adaptable climber. Needs to be kept in check. Well drained soils. Semi-shade or full sun.
Kennedia prostrata Running Postman Vigorous ground cover with clover shaped greyish leaves. Spread is approx. 2 metres. Flowers are pea shaped and vibrant red and appear in winter through to mid spring. Larvae food plant for Long-tailed Pea-blue butterflies (Lampides boeticus). Provides shelter for skinks and insects. Hardy groundcover which responds to light pruning. Suits full sun or dappled light.
Kunzea ambigua White kunzea Large shrub growing to 2-5 metres. Flowers are fluffy and white to pink, occurring in late spring to early summer. Attracts nectar-feeding butterflies and insects. Attracts nectar-feeding birds. Hardy, screen plant.
Kunzea baxteri Scarlet kunzea Medium shrub with small green aromatic leaves. Red brushes flower in spring/summer. Image shows related species with pale flowers. Attracts nectar-feeding butterflies and insects. Attracts nectar-feeding birds. Prune after flowering. Requires good drainage.
Kunzea pomifera Muntries or Muntenberry Prostrate, spreading branches for several metres in sand or terra rossa soils over limestone. Will send down roots from branches as it spreads. Hence good for sand binding. Small insects and birds are attracted to the flowers of this plant. Birds and lizards feed on the seeds. Very hardy in a most situations.
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Large logs Tree branches Logs provide shelter for reptiles, frogs and insects. They are an important feature of Flora for Fauna gardens.
Leaf litter and bark Leaf litter and bark  
Lepidozamia peroffskyana Burrawang Pineapple Palm Tall cycad growing to 7 metres with fronds to 3 metres. Bears large male and female cones to 60 cm. Slow growing. Provides shelter for frogs and geckoes. Useful in a semi-shaded rockery or garden.
Leptospermum 'Aphrodite' Tea tree cultivar 'Aphrodite' A dense, bushy shrub that grows up to 2.5 metres tall and 2 metres wide. It is suitable for screen planting and can be trimmed into a hedge. Masses of bright pink flowers appear in Spring. Provides shelter and nest sites for small birds. The flowers attract a wide range of insects, such as beetles and moths, which are food for many bird species. Tolerates wind and wet conditions. Trim if necessary after flowering. Cam be rejuvinated by pruning severly. Feed with a complete fertilizer in late Summer.
Leptospermum 'Daydream' Tea Tree cultivar 'Daydream' An upright shrub which grows up to 2 metres tall and 1.5 metres wide. Purple/red flowers appear in Spring. Provides shelter and nest sites for small birds. The flowers attract a wide range of insects, such as beetles, hover flies and moths, which are food for many bird species. Plant in full sun to aprt shade. Suitable as a screening plant. Trim lightly after flowering. Feed with a complete fertilizer in late Summer. Suits most soils - preferably not alkaline.
Leptospermum 'Horizontalis' Leptospermum 'Horizontalis' Low spreading shrub with dense green foliage. Masses white flowers in spring. Attracts nectar-feeding beetles. Prune after flowering.
Leptospermum lanigerum Silky Tea-tree Tall shrub growing to 2-3.5 metres high with greyish leaves and white flowers. Attracts nectar feeding and seed eating birds. Attracts nectar-feeding beetles. Wasps take out many insects in swamp areas keeping these areas healthy. Bark moths are also attracted to this plant. Alkaline soils. Likes moist soils. Can withstand very cold conditions including frosts and snow.
Leptospermum liversidgei (selected form) Mozzie Blocker™PBR An upright shrub (1.8m x 1.2m) with fine dense narrow leaves containing very high levels of citronellal oil. Flowers are candy pink, blooming in mid to late summer and attractive to native bees especially. The foliage is effective in deterring mosquitoes from attacking and biting. Native bees and insects are attracted to the massed pink flowers over summer, and are therefore a food source for insect-eating birds such as wrens, notably White-browed Scrub-wrens. Full sun or light shade is best, and a high level of moisture is required constantly. Light to medium frost is tolerated.
Leptospermum madidum Weeping-tree Small tree graceful tree growing to 3-5 metreshigh with weeping woody branches and foliage. Bark smooth cream to white, alternate, smooth narrow blade. Flowers small cream solitary or in small groups. Image shows related species. This tree grows along river beds so all animals would use it for resting and eating. Attracts nectar-feeding beetles. Likes sunny moist situation. Can be grown from seed. Does not tolerate heavy frosts.
Leptospermum 'Merinda' Tea tree cultivar 'Merinda' Merinda is a small, rounded shrub which grows 1 metre high by 1 metre wide. Magenta coloured flowers cover the plant in spring. A wide range of insects, such as beetles and native bees, are attracted to the flowers, which attracts insect-eating birds to the garden. Grows in part-shade to an open, sunny position. Prune after flowering and feed with a complete fertilizer.
Leptospermum 'Outrageous' Tea Tree cultivar 'Outrageous' A medium to tall shrub with drooping branches and deep red flowers in Spring. Grows up to 2 metres tall and 1.5 metres wide. Provides shelter and nest sites for small birds. The flowers attract a wide range of insects, such as beetles and moths, which are food for many bird species. Plant in an open, sunny or lightly shaded position. Feed with a complete fertilizer in late summer. Prune lightly after flowering. Suits most soil types - preferably not alkaline.
Leptospermum 'Pageant' Tea Tree hybrid 'Pageant' Low spreading shrub. Grows between 1 - 1.5 metres tall and 1.5 - 2 metres wide. Purple flowers in spring. Provides shelter and nest sites for small birds. The flowers attract a wide range of insects, such as beetles, hover flies and moths, which are food for many bird species. Plant in full sun or part shade. Suitable for planting in a large tub. Suits most soil types - preferably not alkaline.
Leptospermum petersonii Lemon Scented Teatree Large shrub/small tree with attractive aromatic foliage. White flowers late spring/summer. Attracts nectar-feeding beetles. Prune annually. Fast growing and does well in most well-drained soils. Leaves can be dried and used to make tea. Does not like frost. Suitable for coastal gardens.
Leptospermum 'Rhiannon' Tea Tree cultivar 'Rhiannon' Rhiannon is an upright shrub with large mauve/pink flowers. It grows up to 1.5 metres tall and 1 metre wide. Flowers in spring. A wide range of insects, such as beetles, hover flies and native bees, are attracted to the flowers, which attracts insect-eating birds to the garden. Prefers a well drained position in part shade to an open, sunny position. Prune lightly after flowering and feed with a complete fertilizer. Suits most soil types - preferably not alkaline.
Leptospermum 'Rudolph' Tea tree cultivar 'Rudolph' A fast growing shrub that grows between 2 - 3 metres tall and 2 metres wide. New growth has a purplish colour. Large red flowers appear in mid-Summer. Useful for providing shetler and nest-sites for small birds. A wide range of insects, such as beetles, hover flies and native bees, are attracted to the flowers, which attracts insect-eating birds to the garden. Tolerates waterlogged conditions. Prune lightly after flowering and feed with a complete fertilizer. Suits most soil types - preferably not alkaline.
Leptospermum scoparium 'Freya' Tea tree cultivar 'Freya' Freya ia an upright medium size shrub with soft pink flowers in spring. It grows 1.5 metres tall by 1 metre wide. Useful for providing shelter ansd nest sites for small birds. A wide range of insects, such as beetles, hover flies and native bees, are attracted to the flowers, which attracts insect-eating birds to the garden. Grows in part shade to an open, sunny position. Prune lightly after flowering and feed with a complete fertilizer. Suits most soil types - preferably not alkaline.
Leptospermum 'Tickled Pink' Tea Tree cultivar 'Tickled Pink' Tickled Pink' is an upright growing shrub with vibrant pink flowers in Spring. Grows up to 2 metres tall and 1.5 metres wide. Useful for providing shelter and nest sites for small birds. A wide range of insects, such as beetles, hover flies and native bees, are attracted to the flowers, which attracts insect-eating birds to the garden. Prefers part shade to a open, sunny position. Prune lightly after flowering and feed with a complete fertilizer. Suits most soils - preferably not alkaline.
Leptospermum 'White wave' Tea tree cultivar 'White wave' White wave is a low spreading shrub with a cascading habit. It grows approximately 0.5 metres tall and 1 metre wide. It is covered with a foam of white flowers in Spring. Provides shelter and nest sites for small birds. The flowers attract a wide range of insects, such as beetles, hover flies and moths, which are food for many bird species. Suits most soils, but possibly not those which are alkaline.
Leucopogon species Beard Heath These shrubs have small white or pink flowers and tiny berries. Image not available yet. Flowers are attractive to honeyeaters and berries are eaten by silvereyes and other small birds. Need well, drained soil and compost or thick mulch to keep roots cool.
Livistona australis Cabbage Tree Palm Stately palm with very large fan-like leaves. Attracts Orange Palm Dart Butterflies (Cephrenes augiades) and Yellow Palm Dart (C. trichopepla) butterflies. Top-knot pigeon is attracted to this plant. Prefers a moist, sheltered spot protected from sun and wind. Great for parks and large gardens.
Livistona rigida Cabbage Palm Trunk grows to 10-20 metres high. Fan shaped leaves are 30-40 cm in diameter, stiff, smooth blade. Produces tiny cream flowers about .1 to .3cm. across and groups 3-5 fruit which are globular and finely hairy becoming smooth hard shelled. Bats and birds eat seeds. Slow growing when young. Needs plenty of water, especially in dry periods. Can be grown from seed.
Lomandra confertifolia Grassy Matrush A small grass-like plant which grows to 30 cm high and 70 cm across. It has narrow light green leaves and produces short sprays of cream flowers. Image not available. Attracts Eliena skipper butterflies(Trapizetes eliana), Southern silver ochre butterflies (T. praxedes) and Yellow ochre butterflies (T. lutea). Frost resistant. Grows best in a sunny position.
Lophostemon confertus. (syn. Tristania conferta) Brush Box Attractive tree growing to 10-15 metres high with dark green foliage and smooth pinkish brown bark. Striking variegated foliage forms are also available. Food plant of Common red-eye and Eastern flat butterflies. Also larval food plant for Ornate dusk flat or Rare red-eye (Chaetocneme denitza) and Miskin's or Coral Jewel butterflies (Hypochrysups miskini). This is a secondary food tree for koalas. Red-tailed black-cockatoos, Gang-gang cockatoos, Scaly-breasted Lorikeets, Crimson Rosellas, Pale-headed Rosellas are attracted to this plant. Tolerant of a wide range of well drained soils in partial to full sun. Protect from frost when young can be grown in inland towns if adequate moisture is available.
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Macadamia tetraphylla Macadamia Nut Tree growing to 20 metres. Dark green oblong leaves to 20 cm. White flowers in spring. Edible nut matures March to July. Larval food plant for Large purple line blue (Nacaduba berenice) butterflies. Sulphur-crested Cockatoos are attracted to this plant. Handsome ornamental tree as well as bearing delicious nuts. Needs well-composted soil and ample moisture. Grow in warm, sheltered position.
Macaranga tanarius Macaranga Small tree growing to 6 metres high with large rounded leaves on long stalks. Flowers are insignificant. Larvel food plant for Blue Moonbeam (Philiris nitens) Butterflies. Good foliage plant for frost free areas. Well compacted soil and semi-shade required. Can be grown from seed or cuttings. Does not tolerate frosts.
Macrozamia lucida Pineapple Zamia Part of the ancient group of plants known as cycads. Macrozamias do not produce flowers but their reproductive organs are known as cones. Male and female cones are borne on separate plants and look like pineapples. Attracts Cycad Blue butterflies. Slow growing. Well suited to rockeries. Very fashionable in landscaping.
Macrozamia miquelii Zamia Palm Part of the ancient group of plants known as cycads. Macrozamias do not produce flowers but their reproductive organs are known as cones. Male and female cones are borne on separate plants and look like pineapples. Attracts Cycad Blue butterflies. Slow growing. Well suited to rockeries. Very fashionable in landscaping.
Marsilea drummondii Nardoo Foliage floats upon water surface and is like four-leaf clovers and decorative. Spreads but not usually invasive. Provides shelter for tadpoles, aquatic insects and fish. Sunny or lightly shaded areas suitable for ponds or water gardens.
Marsilea mutica Rainbow Nardoo A fast-growing, floating fern with four-leaf clover-like leaves with interesting leaf markings. Covers a large area. Provides shelter for tadpoles, aquatic insects and fish. Sunny or lightly shaded areas suitable for ponds or water gardens.
Marsilea species Narrow leaf Nardoo Grows to 10cm high by one metre wide with a delicate four-leaf clover-like foliage which is greyish. Provides shelter for tadpoles, aquatic insects and fish. Sunny or lightly shaded areas suitable for ponds or water gardens.
Melaleuca argentea SiIver leafed paperbark Tall spreading tree growing up to 20 metres high with slender pendulous branches and silvery-green foliage. Paper type bark, creamy white to grey. Flowers cream to greeny-cream. Fruit on small stalks with cup-shaped woody capsule. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies Flowers attract lorikeets and lizards. Beautiful foliaged tree for warm areas. Grows best in moist soil and frost-free environment. Can be grown sucessfully from seeds and cuttings. Suitable as a replacement for weeping willows in frost-free areas.
Melaleuca hypericifolia prostrate form Ulladulla Beacon™ A dense quick growing groundcover, carpeting or mounding to 30cm high x 1-2 metres wide. Bright green foliage is highlighted in spring and summer with large bird-attracting orange-red brushes. Caution: This is a selected form of Melaleuca hypericifolia. This species of Melaleuca is regarded as a weed in South Australia and Victoria. Gardners in these states should choose an alternative ground cover. Excellent for attracting small honeyeaters as well as larger species such as the Little and Red Wattlebirds. Full sun or light shade is suitable, and light frost is tolerated. A perfect choice for covering banks, for use as an undershrub, or to cascade down walls or steep slopes. Excellent for coastal gardens especially. May be pruned or trimmed to shape after flowering, and should be fed with controlled release low phosphorus fertilizer in early spring or late summer. Prefers well drained clay or sandy loams, slightly alkaline to neutral and acid pH.
Melaleuca leucadendra Weeping Paperbark Tea Tree Medium to large tree growing to 25 metres with papery bark and silvery-green narrow leaves. Cream flower spikes. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. Host plant of Cyane Jewel (Hypochrysops cyane). Graceful tree for warm climates. Is ideal to plant in boggy, poorly drained areas.
Melaleuca linariifolia Snow in Summer A beautiful tree 5-8 metres high with a spreading crown 2-4 metres wide and a white paper bark trunk. Narrow pale green leaves and delicate white bottlebrush flowers December and January. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. Also attracts Pale-headed rosellas. An ideal shade or street tree. Hardy for most conditions but grows best in sunny, moist position. Is suitable for seaside planting.
Melaleuca quinquenervia Broadleaf Paperbark Tea Tree An attractive tree growing to 6-10 metres high. Thick spongy paperbark covers the trunk and branches providing a contrast to the broad green leaves. Small white bottlebrush flowers twice a year - May to July, and December to January. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. Larvel food plant for Purple Oak-Blue butterflies (Arhopala centauras) and Bright Oak-blue butterflies. Attracts Scaly-breasted lorikeets. Specimen or shade tree. Grows well in all soils. Not suited to small gardens or near sewer pipes etc. Ideal coastal plant.
Melaleuca thymifolia Thyme Honey Myrtle Small shrub growing to 1 metre. Beautiful mauve or reddish flowers, fringed, in clusters-stiff narrow concave leaves. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. Good smaller shrub for wet or dry soils. Ideal for coastal gardens. Light pruning will maintain compact growth.
Melastoma affine Native Lasiandra Rounded shrub of variable height. Flowers are mauve-purple with prominent yellow anthers. They occur mainly in summer but some flowers may appear throughout the year. Attracts Miskin's Jewel butterflies. A hardy plant in protected or south facing situations. Frost tender. Good foliage and long flowering.
Melicope elleryana Pink Doughwood or Corkwood Small tree to 10 metres. Large leaves and small, pink star-shaped flowers. Fruits are brown with dark, brown exposed shiny seeds when mature. Attracts Ulysses Swallowtail butterflies. Birds enjoy small fruits. Fast growing tree. Grows well in most situations but likes moist soils.
Microlaena stipoides Weeping Grass, Meadow Rice Grass A quick growing grass that maintains a good cover of narrow bright green leaves throughout the year. Perennial. The pendent flowering stems glisten with dew. * Can invade garden beds (as many other grasses do!) Larval food plant of Eastern Ringed Xenica and Klugs Zenica. Attracts Wedge Grass Skipper (Anisynta Sphenosema), White-banded grass dart (Taractrocera papyria), White-margined Grass Dart (Ocybadistes hypomeloma), Ring Xenica (Geitoneura acantha), Silver Xenica (Oreixenica lathaniella) and Spotted Brown (Heteronympha paradelpha) butterflies. Attracts small seed-eating birds including the Turquoise Parrot. Best in semi-shade but will tolerate full sunshine. Can be mown but best if only done 3-4 times per year.
Milletia megasperma Native Wisteria Very vigorous climber with dark green glossy leaves and fragrant lilac-mauve pea flowers in 10-15 racemes. Images coming soon. Food plant of Pencilled Blue and Large Banded Awl butterflies. Well drained soils in semi-shade to full sun. Must have very strong support as it is very vigorous.
Mimusops elengi Mimusops elengi An evergree growing to 10-15 metres. Bark rough hard dark grey to black. Leaves alternate smooth. Flowers cream, hairy, scented. Fruit soft hairy bright Rogaine when ripe. Features bark, shiny dark green foliage, bright orange edible fruit. Birds eat the fruit of this plant. The Rose-crowned Fruit-dove and the Red Imperial Pigeon are attracted to this plant. Lovely shade tree. Needs ample moisture. Can be propagated from seed. Popular street tree.
Myoporum parvifolium Creeping Boobialla, Dwarf Native Myrtle Prostrate, semi-succulent plant with bright green, deep green or purplish foliage. Small white to pink starry flowers are produced en masse in late spring and summer and early autumn often followed by small whitish berries. Often self layers by rooting at nodes of stems. Butterflies collect nectar from this plant. It is a larval food plant for the Rayed Blue butterfly (Candalides heathi). When these plants fruit the birds collect it. Usually fast growing, somewhat brittle. Best in sunny site. Responds well to pruning - can cascade down walls/slopes. Excellent for soil erosion control.
Myoporum viscosum Sticky Boobyalla Very leafy dense shrub growing to 1 to 2.5 metres high. Glossy green leaves many white star flowers. Attracts nectar eating birds. Very hardy in well drained, sunny position. Suitable for growing on limestone soils. Propagate from cuttings.
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Olearia phlogopappa Dusty Daisy Bush Medium shrub growing to 1-2 metreshigh by 1 metre across. Greyish oblong leaves with white, pink, blue or mauve daisy flowers in the spring. Attracts the Common Anthelid moth. Needs a well-drained sunny position. Keep well pruned to avoid woody appearance at the base.
Ozothamnus diosmifolius Sago Flower A tall erect shrub that grows to around two metres. Has fine, fragrant foliage. Flowers appear as clusters (like balls). Very attractive plant. Image coming soon. Flower heads attract insects including butterflies and moths. Grows in most well-drained soils in either full sun or shade. Frost resistant. Needs regular pruning.
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Pandanus spiralis Spiral Screw Palm Tree growing to 10 metres high with prickly leaves. Trunk marked with leaf scars. Male and female plants. Finches nest in this plant and larger birds eg cockatoos eat the seeds. Grows best on low lying wet areas. Good coastal plant, Can be grown from seed.
Pandorea jasminoides selected form Lady Di™ A dense vigorous climber with glossy divided foliage and large delicate white golden-throated trumpet flowers and a subtle sweet fragrance, blooming from summer to autumn. The large white flowers attract butterflies, moths and insects to the pollen, and are therefore a good source of food for insect eating birds such as wrens, who may feed among the dense foliage for hours. A climber requiring support such as light wire mesh. Plant at 2 metre centres for quick and effective screening and cover. Regular pruning will maintain shape and fresh growth, and prolific flowering. An application of low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer is beneficial in early spring or late summer. Likes moist, well-drained clay or sandy loams, neutral to acid pH.
Pandorea pandorana 'Snow Bells' Very strong climber with divided (fern-like) shiny leaves. Masses of cream tubular flowers can nearly cover the foliage in spring. Can also flower in Autumn. Flowers have a faint sweet perfume in early evening. Birds collect insects such as passion vine hoppers which are often present on plants in summer. Hawkmoths and hoverflies collect nectar. This plant also provides nesting sites for possums. Prune to contain - give good support frame. Extremely adaptable, does not seed as readily as other selections.
Pandorea pandorana Wonga Wonga Vine Very vigorous climber, which grows very fast. Great for screening. Massed in white flowers in spring. Food plant for Hawkmoth larvae: Psilogramma menephron menepron. Birds collect insects such as passion vine hoppers which are often present on plants in summer. Hoverflies collect nectar. This plant also provides nesting sites for possums. Prune after flowering to encourage bushy growth.Grows best in sunny or shaded position in well composted soil with plenty of moisture. Is frost resistant.
Patersonia occidentalis Purple Flags A tufted bulbous perennial. Leaves, narrow grass-like. Flowers lilac/violet in spring. A butterfly host plant - Eastern Iris-Skipper (Mesodina halyzia) and Blue Iris-Skipper (M. Cyanophracta) butterflies. Good draining acid soils. Prefer sandy soils. Full sun to part shade.
Peltophorum pterocarpum Yellow Flame Tree Dense cronwed spreading tree growing to 10-15 metres. Bark smooth slightly rough, light grey. Flowers bright yellow 2-4 cm. Fruit smooth. Woody capsuled winged. Provides nesting for birds. Propagate with scarified seed. (Rub seed between two sheets of course sandpaper).
Pimelea linifolia Slender Riceflower Slender, erect plant growing to 60 cm high. Terminal heads of white flowers occur most of the year. Attracts Yellow Spot Blue (Candalides xanthospilos) butterflies. Also attracts other butterflies. The Ground Parrot is attracted to this plant. Well drained soil - full sun or part shade. Keep well pruned to encourage branching. Can be used in coastal gardens in protected position.
Pittosporum phylliraeoides Native Apricot Tall shrub to small tree with graceful drooping branches. Avoid the fruit capsule. Maturing red or orange colour seed. Attracts seed eating birds as well as Singing and Spiney-Cheeked Honeyeaters, Ring-necked Parrots and Wattlebirds. Graceful tree with attractive fruit. Grows well on the coast. Can be grown from seed.
Pittosporum rhombifolium Queensland Hollywood Small to medium tree with glossy green leaves and creamy white flowers. A related species is shown. New image coming soon. Attracts nectar feeding butterflies. Hardy tree will grow in any well-drained soils. Is frost-resistant. Ideal for seaside gardens. Slow growing at first.
Platysace lanceolata Edna Walling Flower Girl™ A compact, lightly suckering small shrub (15-25m x 25-40cm) with tightly set tiny rounded leaves. Creamy 'bouquet' clusters of flowers open from pink buds, making a lovely combination of colour from spring to summer. The prefix Edna Walling denotes this selection as representative of the style of plants which Edna Walling, the noted Australian garden designer of the mid-1900s, could have used in present-day gardens. Butterflies and other insects feed on this plant, so it provides a source of food for small foraging birds such as scrub wrens. Suited to full sun or light shade, in near-coastal or inland situations; tolerant of moderate frosts. A cottage garden selection, especially useful as a border plant on pathways or scattered amongst similar plants; a dainty container plant for courtyards and patios. Minimal maintenance is required, only tip pruning to promote dense new growth, and feeding with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in spring or late summer. Likes moist, well drained clay or sandy loams, neutral to acid pH.
Platysace lanceolata (selected form) Edna Walling Pom Pom™ An aromatic bushy small shrub (40-65cm x 50-75cm) with mini 'hydrangea' flowers in spring and summer. Buds are soft pink, opening to creamy white, and are displayed well above the foliage. The prefix Edna Walling denotes this selection as representative of the style of plants which Edna Walling, the noted Australian garden designer of the mid-1900s, could have used in present-day gardens. Butterflies (species not identified) and insects feed on this plant thus providing a source of food for small foraging birds such as scrub wrens. Likes full sun or light shade, will tolerate moderate frost, and suits both inland and second line coastal conditions. It is a perfect cottage garden plant, especially in massed groupings; for borders in small gardens; or as a long flowering container plant for courtyard, deck or terrace. Regular light pruning will create a hedge-like habit. In containers, snip off spent flowers and trim to shape. Feed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in spring or late summer. Prefers moist but well drained clay or sandy soils with neutral to acid pH.
Poa labillardieri Tussock Grass A tight fine leafed tufting grass with greenish to greyish foliage that reaches 50cm to 1.3 metreshigh by 50cm to 1.5 metres wide. Perennial grass. Green to purplish spikes produced in loose panicles mainly in October to February. Chequered Grass Skipper, Marbled Xenica, Xenica butterflies are attracted to this plant. Small seed eating birds such as finches are also attracted. Browsed by kangaroos and wallabies. Adapts well to open or semi-shaded sites. Plants best sheared to ground level in late autumn or early spring.
Polyscias elegans Celerywood Tall tree growing to 25 metres. Often slender and palm-like in appearance. Leaves are very large. Flowers and fruit are not significant. Food tree of Dark Pencilled blue butterfly (Candalides consimilis). Fruit eaten by large range of native birds, especially pigeons. Moist well drained soils with plenty of organic matter in sub-tropical to tropical regions. Sunny position. Will succeed in cooler climates if protected from cold winds. Frost tender.
Pond/Bog Pond/Bog Many animals appreciate ponds and bogs - not just frogs. Birds will visit your pond to drink and bathe - especially if their is shrubby cover nearby.
Pongamia pinnata Pongamia pinnata Dense spreading tree growing generally to 5-10 metres high. Leaves are glossy dark green and thin-textured. They alternate, smooth, pinnate, divided into 2-3 pairs of somewhat oblong leaflets increasing in size to terminal leaflet. Flowers are pale cream/blue or pinkish/white peaflowers. The fruit is smooth, flattish, oblong woody pads. Purple Cerulean butterflies, Chrome Awl butterflies and Narrow-winged Awl are attracted to this plant. Haven for birds and the fruits are eaten by birds. Fresh seed adapts to a wide range of well drained soils, fast growing. Frost -free. Good coastal tree.
Psychotria loniceroides Psychotria loniceroides Shrub growing to 1-2 metres high by 1-1/2 metre wide. They bear clusters of small white flowers followed by small white fruit. A wide variety of butterflies are attracted to the flowers as a nectar source. Is a larval food plant of the Hawkmoth (Hippotion velax). Birds such as Mistleltoe birds, Silver-eyes and small honeyeaters relish the fruit. Full sun to shade. Suitable for most situations. Very hardy.
Ptychosperma bleeseri Ptychosperma bleeseri Thin clumping feather leafed palm growing to 5-10 metres high. Small crown of only 4-6 fronds, weak trunk 3-4 cm diameter. Bark smooth, light grey. Leaves smooth fronds 1-1.1 metres long. Flowers small cream yellow, numerous on drooping branching inflorescenses. Orange Palm-dart butterflies are attracted to this plant. Forest pigeons eat seeds. Score or cut fresh seeds. Germination takes 3-6 months. Requires ample moisture.
Pultenaea villosa Hairy Pea Bush Pendulous, spreading shrub growing to 1.3 metres high by 2 metres across. Narrow-oblong hairy leaves and yellow-red pea flowers in spring. Food plant for P. Villosa butterflies. A hardy plant with very attractive habit. Looks good in well drained soil at pool edge. Can be grown in seaside gardens.
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Restio tetraphyllus Tassel Cord Rush Clump of emerald green reed-like foliage plumes. Bronze seed heads. Excellent plant for ponds and provides shelter for frogs. Excellent with water features. Needs ground moisture - shade/part sun.
Rhodanthe anthemoides (syn.Helipterum anthemoides) Paper Cascade Mounding plant with silvery green foliage and white daisy flowers in winter/spring/summer. Attracts butterflies. Prune to shape. Needs a well-drained and sunny position. Cut back after flowering. Can be used in hanging basket.
Rhodanthe chlorocephala (ssp.rosea) Everlasting Leaves smooth narrow and stems erect. Flowers are papery/ daisy, pink with yellow centers. Grows to 40 cm high by 20cm wide. Larval food plant for Australian Painted Lady butterflies (Vanessa Kershawi). Plant in well-drained soils and in an open position in the garden. Prefers full sun.
Rocks   Rocks are important for lizards. They lie on rocks and soak up the sun's rays. An important addition to Flora for Fauna gardens
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Senna artemisioides x ssp coriacea Silver Cassia Rounded shrub to 2 metres high with silvery grey foliage. Flowers are 'buttercul yellow and have a vanilla scent. Provides seeds for birds and attracts insects. No special requirements although young plants may be frost tender.
Senna artemisoides Desert Cassia Rounded shrub to 2m high by 1.5 m wide. Silvery-grey foliage and divided leaves. Yellow 'buttercup' flowers through all seasons. Flowers have a vanilla or chocolate scent. Birds forage for insects and shelter in branches. Mulga, Red-rumped and Mallee Ringneck parrots eat the immature seeds. Butterflies feed from the flowers. No special requirements although plant can be a little frost tender when young.
Senna artemsioides ssp. filifolia Punty Bush Rounded shrub to 2 metres high x 1.5 metres wide. Silvery -grey foliage. Yellow "buttercup" flowers through all seasons. Flowers have a vanilla or chocolate scent. Attracts insects, good for seed eating birds. No special requirements. Young plants can be slightly frost tender.
Small logs Tree branches Logs provide shelter for reptiles, frogs and insects. They are an important feature of Flora for Fauna gardens.
Syzygium leuhmannii x wilsonii Syzygium 'Cascade" Dense weeping shrub 2-3 metres x 2 metres with bunches of bright pink pom pom flowerheads at the end of branches during summer. Flowers are followed by huge clusters of edible bright pink fruit (berries). Can beslow to flower in southern Australia. Honeyeaters and parrots will feed from large pink flowers. Fruit eating birds and mammals will eat the juicy bright pink fruit. Butterflies and moths are attracted to the flowerheads. Mulch and fertilise (slow release) when planting, keep watered during dry periods. Can be pruned endlessly and shaped into a hedge. Can become frost tender below 0 degrees.
Syzygium suborbiculare Red bush apple Grows to 8-12 metres high with rounded crown. Bark is tight and slightly rough, dark grey-brown in colour. Leaves are smooth, thick leathery, broad, oval to nearly circular. They are glossy dark green above and paler underneath. Distinct venetian oil dots. Large white flowers with numerous stamens. Image coming soon. Shining Oak-blue butterflies are attracted to this plant. Cockatoos love the fruit. Fresh seed adapts to most well drained soil. Alternative small ornamental shade tree.
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Tamarindus indica Tamarind Large spreading tree growing to 15-25 metres high with dense evergreen crown. Bark is rough grey. Tassellated leaves alternative with pinnate smooth dull dark green rounded tip. Flowers pale yellow with curved pistill with losse stamens. Fruit are false capsules which are hairy, becoming smooth. Birds and ants love the fleshy fruit. Can be grown from seed and is adaptable, hardy but slow-growing. An excellent shade tree.
Tecomanthe hillii selected form Edna Walling Island Belle™ A climber of moderate density and vigour, with glossy pinnate foliage and spectacular clusters of large waxy pink bells from spring through summer. The prefix Edna Walling denotes this selection as representative of the style of plants which Edna Walling, the noted Australian garden designer of the mid-1900s, could have used in present-day gardens. Attracts native bees and insects and is therefore a useful food source for small foraging birds such as scrub wrens and robins. Thrives in light or deep shade, will tolerate full sun if roots are cool and protected; frost tender. Suitable for sheltered coastal situations, and protected ferneries or atriums. Will tolerate mild frost. Performs beautifully as an elegant courtyard plant, on a wall or pergola, and is a spectacular container plant. Requires minimal maintenance, simply a light trim occasionally. Feed with low phosphorus controlled release fertilizer in early spring or late summer. Prefers moist but well drained clay or sandy soil.
Telopea spp Waratah A tall open shrub with long serrated, thick leathery leaves. Large, stunning red flowers. Image coming soon. Provides a source of nectar for honeyeaters. Beautiful flowers can be cut for dsiplay or left on the plant pruned once flowering is finished. Needs deep, well drained soil and good cover of mulch to keep roots cool.
Templetonia retusa Cockies Tongue Medium open shrub with greyish green leaves. Flowers are showy with scarlet pea flower in winter or spring. Grows to 2 metres high and 1 metre wide. Larval host plant of Long-tailed Pea-blue butterfly (Lampides boeticus). Attracts honeyeaters and nectar eating birds. Open well-drained soil - coastal and inland sunny aspect.
Terminalia sericocarpa Terminalia sericocarpa Large spreading deciduous tree growing to 15-30 metres high. Has dense, broad crown and ascending layered branches. Trunk often buttressed. Bark rough, grey to black. Strong scented cream flowers. Fruit flattish (avoid fleshy drupes). Image coming soon. Butterflies congregate around this plant including Copper Jewels, Purple Oak-blue and Narrow-winged Awl. Birds are attracted to the fruit which are high in vitamin C. Wompoo Fruit-dove and Superb Fruit-dove are attracted to this plant. Fresh seed, adapts to a wide range of well-drained soils, requires ample moisture - fast growing.
Themeda australis Kangaroo Grass Attractive tufting perennial native grass growing up to 1 metre with brownish flower heads between spring and summer. Has green or sometimes greyish leaves. Attracts the following butterflies: Ringed Xenica, Marbled Xenica, Dingy Brush Brown and Common Brown butterflies. Host plant for Spotted Brass Skipper, White-margined Grass Dart, Evening Brown, Cedar Bush Brown, Orange Bush Brown, Orange Ringlet and Shouldered Brown butterflies. Also seed eating birds. Important food source for finches and parrots including the Ground Parrot. Prefers sunny position in medium soils. Best sheared to just above ground level late autumn or early spring to rejuvenate clumps.
Thryptomene saxicola Pink or Rock Thryptomene A small shrub growing to 1 metre high with small arching branches of small pink flowers covering the bush in autumn/winter. Birds eat the insects attracted to this plant. A very hardy small shrub for any situation. Prune or take cut flowers to encourage compact growth and abundant flowering.
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Verticordia chrysantha Golden Feather Flower Small rounded shrub with crowded small leaves. Flowers in masses of bright yellow fringed calyxes in spring time. Grows to 80cm high and 50cm wide. Attracts insects. Open well-drained soil. Full sun. Ideal container plant.
Viola betonicifolia Purple violet Small, tufted plant with violet shaped purplish-blue flowers. Attracts Australian Fritillary butterflies. This adaptable plant will grow in most situations but grows best in moist shetered position. Is frost tolerant and can be planted in alpine gardens.
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Westringia fruticosa Coastal Rosemary Compact hardy shrub with greyish foliage and white flowers from November to February. Attracts Rayed Blue butterflies. Will grow most places from seaside to inland. Can prune into shapes & topiary.
Westringia glabra Violet Westringia Medium shrub with profuse mauve flowers in spring/summer. Similar species Westringia fruticosa pictured right. Attracts insects. Provides shelter for small birds. Prune after flowering.
Westringia hybrid form Edna Walling Rosemary™ A shapely small to medium shrub (80cm x 1.2m), with soft grey green foliage and dainty violet-lilac flowers which bloom from winter to summer. The prefix Edna Walling denotes this selection as representative of the style of plants which Edna Walling, the noted Australian garden designer of the mid-1900s, could have used in present-day gardens. Butterflies, native bees and insects observed feeding on flowers; a useful plant for small foraging birds such as robins and scrub wrens. Loves full sun or light shade, suitable for coastal and inland gardens, and will tolerate light frosts. An excellent hedge plant, requiring light pruning in first year to develop dense growth, and regular trimming to maintain shape. Feed in early spring or late summer with controlled release low phosphorus fertilizer.
Wilkiea macrophylla Large-leaved Wilkiea Small tree growing to 9 metres. Flowers are insignificant. Attracts Regent Skipper butterflies. Useful as a foliage plant for background planting.
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Xanthorrhoea australis Grass Tree Short black trunked plants with long grass like leaves growing to 1 metre depending on age. Creamy white flowering spikes 1-2 metres long during spring. Honey eaters and numerous colourful beetles and insects are attracted to the nectar rich flowers. Insectivorous birds are attracted to the insects. Lorikeets feed on the soft seeds and rosellas on the seed capsules. Antechinus feed on attracted insects. Grows best in any well-drained soils in sunny positions.
Xanthorrhoea preissii Grass tree Grows, very slowing, to 1 metre high. Flowers after a fire or rarely otherwise. Many insects in the skirts with native animal homes under the skirts. Grows best in any well drained soils in sunny positions.

About us

dale-john 01-100x66 Dale Harvey and John Newton met in Melbourne Australia in 1981. Since then they both have supported each others careers while also building and maintaining their own. Read about how they were able to turn their joint careers into one and creating a dream of a better world starting in their own local community.

Media & Publications

host daffodils-100x66The following articles are a small part of the many published editorials on or about both Dale Harvey and John Newton plus the property affectionately nick named by the people of New Zealand, as the
"Quarter Acre” Paradise gardens.

Awards & Credits

HOPE Trust-100x66This is a collection of Appreciation Certificates, Local and Overseas Awards with Acknowledgments presented to Dale Harvey and John Newton over the many years of their joint careers plus the Launch and Registration
of The H.O.P.E. Trust
The Healing of Planet Earth.

Contact Us

P.O.Box Papatoetoe Central
2156 Auckland
New Zealand
Tel: +61 9 276 4827
Fax: +61 9 276 4025
Email: info@daleharvey.com 
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